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    University of Hartford
   
 
  Oct 20, 2017
 
 
    
2015-2016 Undergraduate Bulletin [ARCHIVED BULLETIN]

College of Engineering, Technology, and Architecture



The College of Engineering, Technology, and Architecture (CETA) provides challenging programs that prepare graduates for stimulating, meaningful, and rewarding professional careers.

Engineering is widely regarded as one of the most rewarding of the professions. It provides highly satisfying and diverse career opportunities, substantial tangible rewards, and the prospect of community recognition and respect. Preparation for the profession is demanding. Engineers must be adept in applying the fundamentals of mathematics and science to the ever-changing problems of society. They work in such complex and dynamic areas as transportation, energy systems, manufacturing, space, and undersea exploration. Undergraduate preparation in engineering may lead to employment in a specialization, graduate studies, further professional training and skill development, and ultimately, executive responsibilities. The accelerating growth of engineering and its dispersion in all areas of modern society ensure a continuing demand for the skilled professional engineer. At the same time, engineers are in great demand to fill leadership roles in industry, government, and education, where their experience and training in analysis, organization, and problem solving are highly regarded.

An education in engineering technology prepares students to work as members of professional-design or manufacturing teams in large companies or to be entrepreneurs and develop an innovative product in a small company. Students are prepared for immediate employment upon graduation, with possibilities for upward mobility in their chosen fields. They may also continue toward graduate study. Engineering technologists have a strong background in mathematics, basic science, communication skills, and the fundamentals of their discipline (architecture, electronics, mechanical, computers, or audio), as well as many practical, hands-on skills. Hence, engineering technologists can work with the architect or engineer in design work and then supervise the draftsperson or technician who documents or implements that design. Engineering technology is a dynamic academic discipline affording flexibility to the aspiring and talented student who enjoys both a hands-on approach to technology and an intellectual curiosity about how things work.

Our pre-professional architecture degree program, Architectural Engineering Technology offers an optional studio experience through the Studio-Intensive Track (SIT). This path provides more hours of conceptual studio training with architectural models and other tools for design studios that meet three afternoons each week compared to the standard studio, which meets two afternoons each week.  This provides a third afternoon of studio for those students who want additional formal contact with their design professors for design reviews, architectural exploration, and developing architectural design skills.

CETA offers expanded possibilities for study in the fields of engineering, technology, and architecture. A student may choose engineering, with its emphasis on theory, analysis, and design; technology, with an emphasis on hands-on application of theory; or architecture, with its emphasis on building design, architecture theory and sustainable design and building technologies. We promote interdisciplinary education, and our college affords many opportunities to work with other engineers, technologists, and architects on the challenging problems that face today’s world.

Programs of Study

For a list of programs, click here .

Mission

The mission of the College of Engineering, Technology, and Architecture is to a deliver a high-quality education and prepare individuals for professional careers in engineering, technology, and architecture, or for further graduate studies. Preparing individuals to function as effective members of a global society, our programs promote technical excellence, reasoning ability, communication and interpersonal skills, and an understanding of ethical and moral issues. Our graduates are strongly encouraged to pursue professional registration in their chosen fields. Programs are available to both day and evening students. Practice-oriented educational experiences are offered at the undergraduate and graduate levels.

Faculty

The faculty combines impressive educational backgrounds with broad experience in business and industry; their primary commitment is to instruct undergraduate and graduate students. Most are registered professional engineers who are currently engaged in consulting and research in their specialties. This professional involvement and the leadership roles that faculty play in their professional communities are transferred into the classroom, where students are kept apprised of contemporary developments in the field and are introduced to the professional networks into which they will shortly enter.

This mission is carried out by excellent, dedicated, and student-focused faculty who remain on the cutting edge of their specializations. Faculty and their students work with industry to bring the principles of professional practice into the classroom to achieve goals beneficial to all.

Facilities

Facilities are extensive and modern, with space in United Technologies Hall, Dana Hall, the Biology-Chemistry Building, and the Harry Jack Gray Center. These areas provide ample classroom and conference space as well as state-of-the-art laboratories and computer hardware/software. The college provides laboratories for research and hands-on applications in acoustics, vibrations (including anechoic and reverberation chambers), heat power, energy conversion, automatic controls, electronics, microprocessor, FPGA/CPLD, VLSI, communication, digital signal processing, fluid mechanics, water resources, instrumentation, mechatronics, geographical information systems, materials, computer science, soil mechanics, manufacturing, and computer-aided engineering design, as well as architectural and audio studios.

Facilities are also available in the Hartford Art School and The Hartt School. The college provides access to its equipment and facilities through open lab and studio time available to students weekdays, nights, and weekends.

Admission Requirements

General requirements and procedures for admission are given in Admission of Students. In reviewing applications for admission, the college considers a number of factors, including high school performance, the nature of the high school program, scores on standardized tests, and any evidence of special skills and talents relevant to engineering, technology, and architecture.

Engineering Program Requirements*

For admission to engineering programs, 16 units of secondary subjects are expected; these should include the following:

English 4 units
Social studies 2 units
One language 2 units
Laboratory science 2 units
  Chemistry and physics are strongly recommended.  
Mathematics 3.5 units
  These must include the following specific units: algebra, 2 units; plane geometry, 1 unit; trigonometry, .5 unit.  
Other academic subjects 2.5 units
   

Additional units are recommended in elective courses, such as calculus or precalculus, computer programming, mechanical drawing, and industrial arts.

*Those whose secondary school preparation does not include all of these requirements-for example, those pertaining to laboratory science and mathematics-may be required to undertake preparatory course work during the summer or other period as part of a provisional admission to the University of Hartford. A personal interview with a department chair is strongly recommended for those students whose admission is contingent on such additional preparation.

Technology Program Requirements

For admission to technology programs, candidates must meet the following requirements:

English 4 units
Social Studies 1 unit
Laboratory Science 1 unit of physics or 2 units of another lab science
Mathematics 2.5 units
  (including two units of algebra) These must include the following specific units: algebra, 2 units; trigonometry, .5 unit.  

Transfer Students

The college will apply transfer credits granted by the University for prior college work from regionally accredited institutions, subject to evaluation of the details of such work by the transfer evaluator in consultation with the appropriate department chair. Prospective students with prior college work should request an interview with the transfer evaluator/department chair to discuss transfer credit options.

The University of Hartford is a member institution of the Connecticut College of Technology (COT). COT offers an engineering pathway that allows a student to begin engineering studies at any of the state’s 12 community colleges with the ultimate goal of achieving a four-year baccalaureate degree in engineering or technology at the University of Hartford.

Academic Regulations

Students in the college must meet the University requirements for satisfactory academic progress and good academic standing. These are specified in the section on Academic Regulations.

Students who do not make satisfactory academic progress are subject to actions ranging from probation or removal from degree candidacy to dismissal from the University. Students who receive notification of such actions are strongly encouraged to consult immediately with their advisors to develop a plan of corrective action.

Satisfactory Progress

Students in the College of Engineering, Technology, and Architecture must meet both qualitative and quantitative academic progress (see University Minimum Standards for Undergraduates).

Pass/No Pass Option

Students matriculated in CETA degree programs must take all courses within CETA for a letter grade, unless the course is only offered Pass/No Pass (P/NP).

Students matriculated in CETA degree programs must take all courses within the University of Hartford that are required for their major(s) for a letter grade.

Students may not take mathematics, science, professional electives, or computer science elective courses on a P/NP basis.

Students matriculated in CETA may not take AUCS 340 and engineering majors may not take AUCW 180 or AUCW 212 on a P/NP basis.

Humanities and social science elective courses may be taken on a P/NP basis, subject to the limits imposed by the University for the frequency of such courses.

Internships, when taken for credit as a professional elective, may be graded on a P/NP basis.

Students matriculated in other colleges of the University of Hartford may take any CETA course on a P/NP basis. If, however, the student later matriculates into a CETA degree program, the course(s) taken P/NP may not be accepted for credit toward a CETA degree.

Course Prerequisites

CETA follows a system of prerequisites and corequisites for every undergraduate course as stated in the course descriptions in this Bulletin. These requirements are designed to ensure that students have the necessary background knowledge for the courses in which they are enrolled. This strategy is also essential to ensure that students will successfully complete those courses and to maintain our ABET (Accreditation Board for Engineering and Technology, www.abet.org) accreditation from both the Engineering Accreditation Commission (EAC) and the Engineering Technology Accreditation Commission (ETAC). The following programs are accredited by EAC of ABET: Acoustical Engineering and Music, Biomedical, Civil, Computer, Electrical, and Mechanical Engineering. The following programs are accredited by ETAC of ABET: Architectural, Electronic, and Mechanical Engineering Technology. Thus, the departments adhere strictly to this established policy, and waivers are considered only for truly exceptional cases.

Course Prerequisite Waivers

Any request for waiving an established department or college rule must be submitted to and discussed with the instructor who will use the standard college form that both the student and instructor must sign and forward a copy to the department chair. If it is approved, the advisor forwards the waiver to the chair of the department or his/her representative for approval. If approved, the form is forwarded to the dean or his representative for final approval.

Although the Banner system is primarily used for prerequisite and preprofessional checks, students will be administratively withdrawn at any time during the term if found to be lacking the necessary pre- and co-requisites without the proper approvals.

Honors Program

The college encourages students to participate in the University Honors program (see Special Academic Opportunities).

Selection of students for participation in the honors program is based on academic achievement. A minimum overall GPA of 3.0 must be achieved to receive the honors designation. Questions regarding this program should be directed to the CETA honors program coordinator.

Engineering Students. CETA makes the following available to participating engineering students: freshman honors seminar; honors sections in selected engineering science courses; engineering departments’ selected honors courses and activities specific to the majors administered by them; upper-level independent study and research projects; and interaction with local industries, including participation in the school’s Engineering Applications Center’s projects.

Technology Students. Students may participate in the program when they have attained a minimum GPA of 3.0 based on the completion of at least 15 credits in CETA. To continue in the program, students must maintain a minimum overall GPA of 3.0 and 3.25 in their major. The program requires 18 credits of honors course work distributed as follows: 6 credits of honors All-University Curriculum courses, 6 credits of honors courses or contract honors courses at the 200 level or above that are part of the student’s major, and 6 credits in senior-level independent study courses, such as the Senior Project course and/or the University Scholar program.

Registration

Registration for any part of CETA’s programs must be initiated through the student’s faculty advisor each semester. Advisors are assigned upon matriculation in a CETA program and may maintain their association with their advisees for the duration of the student’s undergraduate program. The faculty advisor must approve each registration. The advisor will also assist the student in course scheduling and in understanding the requirements for completion of the degree program.

The degree programs are designed primarily to prepare the student for future practice in a profession and to lay the academic groundwork for employment and/or graduate school. Most faculty members in engineering have had industrial and teaching experience prior to joining the University. Strong emphasis is placed on the professional aspects of engineering technology. Graduate study beyond the baccalaureate level is encouraged.

Depending on the major, 126-141 credits are required for the bachelor’s degree. Applicable transfer credits from other institutions are included and are awarded and applied toward the degree program after the student is admitted and official transcripts are evaluated by the Office of Admission and a department chair.

Dual Major or Degree Program

Students desiring a double major or second baccalaureate degree should refer to Requirements for Degrees. Students should also consult the deans of the colleges concerned.

Minors

The college supports minors offered by other University programs as long as all degree program requirements are met. In many instances, course work beyond the 126-141 credits required for the engineering/technology degree will be necessary to satisfy the requirements of the minor as well. Students should consult the chair of the department in which the minor area is offered.

The College of Engineering, Technology, and Architecture offers minors in biomedical, civil, computer, electrical, mechatronics, and mechanical engineering, as well as architectural audio, computer, electronic, and mechanical engineering technology, to students matriculating in bachelor’s programs in other colleges at the University. These cross-college minors enable students to satisfy their individual educational or career objectives by supplementing their major programs of with other fields of study.

Students must apply for admission into the minors no earlier than the end of their first year. Students must have a 2.0 overall grade point average and must maintain at least a 2.00 grade point average for courses in the minors, unless otherwise noted. Approvals by the student’s major advisor and dean are required. An advisor for the minor will be assigned by CETA.

3+2 Program (B.S.E. + M.Eng. degrees)

The program is designed to allow full-time engineering students to earn both their B.S.E. and M.Eng. (Master of Engineering) degrees in five years. Two graduate-level courses taken in the senior year may be applied to both the undergraduate and graduate degree requirements. Students usually must commit to the program at the start of the second semester of their junior year, and juniors who are interested should contact the department chair or call 860.768.4858 for application materials.

In order to be accepted into the program, students must have a 3.0 cumulative grade point average (GPA) at the end of their junior year (less than 3.0 will be considered on a case-by-case basis). For further details, see the Graduate Bulletin.

All-University Curriculum

A distinctive feature of the University of Hartford educational experience is the All-University Curriculum (AUC) (see University Studies). The All-University Curriculum requirement for the associate’s degree is a minimum of one AUC course; for the baccalaureate degree, the requirement is a minimum of four AUC courses.

Engineering students must take four to six courses (12-18 credits) in the humanities and social sciences, selecting two AUC courses from the following two categories: AUCC (Living in a Cultural Context: Other Cultures) and AUCA (Living Responsively to the Arts). In addition, they are required to take AUCW 180 - A Western Heritage: The Humanities or AUCW 212 - Discovering America II: American Civilization 1865-1945; and AUCS 340 - Ethics in the Professions, and up to two elective courses in the humanities and social sciences.

Technology students desiring the baccalaureate degree must take five courses (15 credits) in the humanities and social sciences, selecting one humanities/social science elective and one AUC course from each of the following three categories: AUCW (Western Heritage), AUCC (Living in a Cultural Context), and AUCA (Living Responsively to the Arts). In addition, they are required to take  AUCS 340 - Ethics in the Professions for AUCS (Living in a Social Context). Students desiring the associate’s degree must select one AUC course from any of those categories.

CETA Engineering and Technology Internship Program

The CETA internship program enhances traditional classroom and laboratory education with work opportunities. Internships provide the opportunity for students to apply their academic education while allowing them to obtain the practical experience necessary to perform successfully in today’s world. The director of the CETA internship program administers the program. The student’s faculty advisor assists in identifying an appropriate internship, clarifying job expectations, and granting academic credit for the internship.

CETA undergraduate students majoring in engineering and engineering technology (other than architectural engineering technology) may participate in the internship program. To be eligible for an internship, CETA students must have completed their sophomore year, have junior class standing, and have a cumulative grade point average of 2.5 or above. Transfer students become eligible for an internship after one semester of full-time study and junior standing, upon the recommendation of their academic advisor and approval of the department chair. Engineering technology associate’s degree candidates may participate in an internship; however, the credits earned may only be used to fulfill B.S. degree requirements.

Positions may be full time or part time, with course credit awarded based on the number of hours worked. To receive 1 credit, the internship must be for at least 80 hours; to receive 2 credits, the internship must be for at least 160 hours; and to receive 3 credits, the internship must be for at least 240 hours. A student may only earn 3 internship credits during a semester.

In all internships the work performed must be consistent with the student’s current level of education and experience.

With their academic advisor’s approval, students may apply credit earned toward their degree requirements as professional electives or unrestricted electives but not toward required courses or technical specialties. The number of credits earned through internships that may be applied to a student’s degree varies among programs. For engineering degrees, 3 credits may be applied to a degree. For engineering technology the number of credits that may be applied is as follows:
• Audio engineering technology:        6 credits
• Computer engineering technology:  3 credits
• Electronic engineering technology:  3 credits
• Mechanical engineering technology: 6 credits

CETA receives many inquiries, mostly from Connecticut-based firms, on internship availability. In addition, the Career Center maintains a website listing internships by geographic location and field of study. The Office of Experiential Education and Student Employment in the Career Center can assist in finding internship positions.

Questions regarding the CETA internship programs should be directed to the director of CETA internship programs.

Accreditation

All programs in CETA are licensed and accredited by the State of Connecticut Board of Higher Education. 

The following programs within the College of Engineering, Technology, and Architecture are accredited by the Engineering Accreditation Commission (EAC) of the Accreditation Board for Engineering and Technology (ABET): the Bachelor of Science in Engineering in acoustical engineering and music, the Bachelor of Science in Engineering in biomedical engineering, the Bachelor of Science in Civil Engineering, the Bachelor of Science in Computer Engineering, the Bachelor of Science in Electrical Engineering, and the Bachelor of Science in Mechanical Engineering. Contact ABET at 111 Market Place, Suite 1050, Baltimore, MD 21202-4012; 410.347.7700; www.abet.org.

The Bachelor of Science programs in Electronic Engineering Technology, Architectural Engineering Technology, and Mechanical Engineering Technology are accredited by the Engineering Technology Accreditation Commission (ETAC) of ABET. Contact ABET at 111 Market Place, Suite 1050, Baltimore, MD 21202-4012; 410.347.7700; www.abet.org.

The Master of Architecture program is accredited by the National Architectural Accrediting Board (NAAB), 1735 New York Avenue NW, Washington, DC 20006; www.naab.org.

Certification

Graduates of all technology programs are eligible for certification by the National Institute for Certification in Engineering Technologies (NICET), sponsored by the National Society of Professional Engineers (NSPE), 1420 King St., Alexandria, VA 22314-2794.

Professional Societies

The University is a member of the American Society for Engineering Education (ASEE) and the Association of Collegiate Schools of Architecture (ACSA). The college has active chapters of ASME, ASCE, IEEE, SWE, SAE, ASA, AIAS, AES, FSAE, NSBE, BMES, and IAS, as listed under Student Activities below. CETA is also a member of the Engineering Research Council of the American Society for Engineering Education.

Student Activities

The college supports the major student professional associations, including student chapters of technical societies and professional organizations, such as the American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME), the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE), the American Society of Civil Engineers (ASCE), the Society of Women Engineers (SWE), the Society of Automotive Engineers (SAE), Acoustical Society of America (ASA), American Institute of Architects (AIAS), Audio Engineering Society (AES), Instrument Society of America (ISA), Engineers Without Borders (EWB) and the Construction Institute.

Honor societies include Eta Kappa Nu, the National Electrical Engineering Honor Society; Pi Tau Sigma, the National Mechanical Engineering Honor Society; Sigma Epsilon, the Civil Engineering Honor Society; and Tau Sigma Delta, the National Honor Society for Architecture. Tau Beta Pi, the National Engineering Honor Society, draws membership from all engineering disciplines. Tau Alpha Pi, the National Honor Society for engineering technologies, draws its membership from all technology disciplines.

Engineering Programs

Engineering is widely regarded as one of the most rewarding of the professions. It provides its members with highly satisfying and diverse career opportunities, substantial tangible rewards, and the prospect of community recognition and respect. Preparation for the profession is demanding. Engineers must be adept in applying the fundamentals of mathematics and science to the ever-changing problems of society. They work in such complex and dynamic areas as transportation, energy systems, manufacturing, space, and undersea exploration.

Undergraduate preparation in engineering may lead to employment in a specialty area, to further professional training in engineering, and, ultimately, to executive responsibilities. The accelerating growth of technology and its dispersion to all areas of modern society ensure a continuing demand for the skilled professional engineer. At the same time, engineers are in great demand to fill leadership roles in business, industry, government, and education, where their experience and training in analysis, organization, and problem solving are equally applicable.

Engineering Mission

The mission is to provide high-quality engineering education at the undergraduate and graduate levels, directed primarily toward preparing engineers for professional careers in industry and the public sector and for professional engineering registration, continually updated and consistent with the trends active within the engineering profession. This education is provided to full- and part-time students and offers continuing educational opportunities to graduate engineers. It is achieved through the efforts of excellent, dedicated, and student-focused faculty and staff, supported by University and industrial facilities and resources. CETA provides well-equipped, up-to-date facilities as well as a dedicated faculty and staff whose foremost commitment is to the preparation of future generations of engineers.

The college offers baccalaureate degree programs in five central areas of engineering: Acoustical, Biomedical, Civil, Computer, Electrical, and Mechanical. These are carefully coordinated with the programs of the other schools and colleges of the University to provide the balanced preparation that future professionals will require. Available in both day and evening offerings, these programs are accredited by the Engineering Accreditation Commission (EAC) of the Accreditation Board for Engineering and Technology (ABET). CETA also has State of Connecticut accreditation to offer a Bachelor of Science in Interdisciplinary Engineering Studies. In addition, the college cooperates with other schools and colleges of the University to make available a variety of interdisciplinary programs and minors to students with special interests.

CETA is strongly committed to a personalized style of instruction that emphasizes one-on-one interaction between students and faculty. This is reflected in its strong academic advising, close coordination with the University’s Career Center and Cooperative Education Services, and the many preprofessional activities that it makes available to students.

Technology Programs

Engineering technology prepares students for careers that are stimulating and rewarding. Graduates find themselves well prepared for upward mobility as members of professional technological design teams in their chosen fields of architectural, audio, computer, electronic, or mechanical engineering technology, or in an individually designed contract major in engineering technology. The engineering technologist’s preparation includes a strong background in mathematics, basic science, communication skills, fundamentals of the discipline, and practical, hands-on skills. This substantial readiness allows interface with an architect or engineer preparing a design as well as supervision of the draftsperson or technician implementing the design.

The strong elective component of the baccalaureate programs in Architectural, Audio, Computer, Electronic, and Mechanical Engineering Technology allows preparation for a diversity of career goals, including graduate study. Many students take additional technical courses to supplement their elective requirements, while others take courses in business, science, mathematics, engineering, fine arts, or education. The contract major option allows students to prepare for specialized careers in technology, management, and teaching, or for graduate study.

Technology itself is changing and changing our world at a rate unprecedented in the history of humankind. Opportunities for an engineering technology graduate who enjoys a hands-on approach and has an intellectual curiosity about how things work are virtually limitless.

Technology Mission

The mission is to offer men and women opportunities to prepare for professional careers as architects, engineering technicians, and technologists; and, at the same time, to develop their abilities to function as effective members of society. Academic programs are designed to promote technical excellence, reasoning ability, communication and interpersonal skills, and an understanding of the ethical and moral issues associated with the application of technology in contemporary society.

Mathematics and Technical Communications

Mathematics and some of the technical communications courses are taught in CETA for the technology programs (including architecture students) as a means of ensuring that they have the tools necessary to succeed in course work and in their careers. Both subject areas are taught as hands-on activities with an emphasis on practical applications.

Those technology students who wish to minor in engineering fields or pursue their education in graduate school are advised to take their mathematics courses in the College of Arts and Sciences, where the emphasis is on theory and broad coverage of the discipline.