The page uses Browser Access Keys to help with keyboard navigation. Click to learn moreSkip to Navigation

Different browsers use different keystrokes to activate accesskey shortcuts. Please reference the following list to use access keys on your system.

Alt and the accesskey, for Internet Explorer on Windows
Shift and Alt and the accesskey, for Firefox on Windows
Shift and Esc and the accesskey, for Windows or Mac
Ctrl and the accesskey, for the following browsers on a Mac: Internet Explorer 5.2, Safari 1.2, Firefox, Mozilla, Netscape 6+.

We use the following access keys on our gateway

n Skip to Navigation
k Accesskeys description
h Help
    University of Hartford
   
 
  Sep 23, 2017
 
 
    
2015-2016 Undergraduate Bulletin [ARCHIVED BULLETIN]

College of Arts and Sciences



The College of Arts and Sciences is the University’s central and largest college. Through its instruction in the humanities, sciences, and social sciences, the College of Arts and Sciences seeks to foster respect for excellence, tolerance of others, dedication to fairness and social justice, precision in speech and thought, and development of intellect.

It does so through a mixture of traditional and innovative programs. Particularly noteworthy are the developing interdisciplinary programs that cut across traditional boundaries and focus on emerging social need and issues in reading and writing, literature, the environment, internationalization, media, communication, and technology.

The college’s 18 departments and School of Communication provide specialized training and advanced work leading to the B.A., B.S., A.S., and A.A. degrees. Details regarding programs of study and majors are available using the above links. The mastery of a major area of concentration prepares students for careers, for continuing their studies independently, and for undertaking graduate study and research.

Facilities

Abrahms Hall is home to the Cinema department and the Cinema and Media Studies Editing Suite.

Auerbach Hall provides facilities for the departments of English, Gender Studies, Rhetoric and Professional Writing, Philosophy, the Center for Reading and Writing, the English Language Institute, Learning Plus, and the Maurice Greenberg Center for Judaic Studies.

The Biology-Chemistry Building, approximately 40,000 square feet in total size, contains the Chemistry and Biology departments. The building has modern labs and research facilities for undergraduate students.

The Biology-Chemistry Building and Dana Hall are part of an Integrated Science, Engineering, and Technology complex. The University has grouped the sciences, engineering, and technology into one complex to promote interdisciplinary activities.

The Charles A. Dana Hall is home to the departments of Mathematics, Computer Science, and Physics. Special features of the building include the Mali I and Mali II lecture halls, which contain 120-seat classrooms; a computer laboratory; and individual research laboratories for students and faculty. Dana Hall also has a rooftop greenhouse, classrooms, faculty offices, a lounge, and seminar rooms.

East Hall houses the Department of Psychology. The building offers classrooms equipped with projection equipment, a computer classroom, research laboratory space, and a drop-in computer lab. Facilities throughout East Hall are shared by faculty, students, and staff from the various programs in the department.

Harry Jack Gray Center provides space for the School of Communication and the college’s television production and broadcasting facilities. In addition, the Harry Jack Gray Center includes a classroom overlooking the television studio.

Hillyer Hall provides facilities for the Economics, History, International Studies, Modern Languages and Cultures, Political Economy, Politics and Government, and Sociology and Criminal Justice departments. This building includes rooms for classes, seminars and conferences, as well as the Herbert Gilman Family Center for Communication Technology. The Beatrice Fox Auerbach Auditorium, which seats more than 200, is used for lectures, recitals, films, and dramatic performances.

Advising

The College of Arts and Sciences has the long-established Freshman Dialogue program to assist new students in adjusting to academic and campus life. Students meet at least one hour a week in small groups with a faculty advisor to discuss educational and career goals, curricular and extracurricular options, and the relevance to their own lives of a liberal education.

DIA 100 - Dialogue  

Admission Requirements

General requirements and procedures for admission are given in Admission of Students .

For admission to the College of Arts and Sciences, 16 units of secondary subjects are expected, among which the following are strongly recommended:

English 4 units  
Social studies 2 units  
One language 2 units  
Mathematics (including 1 unit of algebra) 3 units  
Science 2 units  
Other academic subjects 3 units  
     

Applicants for the Bachelor of Science programs must have three years of college preparatory mathematics, including trigonometry.

Academic Centers

Herbert Gilman Family Center for Communication Technology

The Gilman Center is located in Hillyer Hall, room 319. This College of Arts and Sciences computer lab accommodates classes of up to 28 students. Each student station has an up-to-date Windows® computer station with the current operating system, Office® suite, and statistical analysis software. Instructors have the ability to project their screen to the front of the room; for demonstration and collaborative work purposes, they can also project any of the student stations. The room is used for the sciences as well as the humanities.

The Gilman Family Center was made possible through a gift from the Gilman family and Ames Department Stores.

Maurice Greenberg Center for Judaic Studies and Chair in Judaic Studies

The University’s offerings in Judaic studies are administered through the Maurice Greenberg Center for Judaic Studies, an endowed, academic program within the College of Arts and Sciences. Judaic Studies is an interdisciplinary program of study that focuses on Israel, Jews and Judaism, including, but not limited to, historical, linguistic, religious, sociological, political, literary and philosophical perspectives from the ancient Near East to the modern world. The Maurice Greenberg Center for Judaic Studies was made possible through a gift from Arnold C. and Beverly P. Greenberg, in honor of Arnold’s father, Maurice.

Humanities Center

The Humanities Center of the College of Arts and Sciences fosters serious interdisciplinary study of the humanities by sponsoring lectures, symposia, and seminars on timely topics. Each year students and faculty members are selected to be Fellows of the center. The Fellows meet regularly to hear lectures, exchange ideas, and pursue individual research. The center also awards scholarships (for first-year and sophomore students) and fellowships (for juniors and seniors) to students majoring or minoring in  the humanities who meet certain academic criteria. The Humanities Center is funded by a National Endowment for the Humanities matching grant.

Television and Radio Studios

The television studio, the site of all television production classes, is furnished with broadcast television equipment and separate editing suites and has the capability of campuswide video distribution. The facility can accommodate stereo postproduction and live television production.

The University houses two modern radio stations, WSAM and WWUH. The facilities of WSAM are the site of radio production courses. Students are active on the air and behind the scenes at both stations.

Special Programs

Premedical Professional Programs: Chiropractic, Dentistry, Medicine, Optometry, Osteopathy, Podiatry, Veterinary Medicine

These programs are designed to provide students with the broad cultural background and rigorous scientific training necessary as preparation for these various healthcare professional schools. Although requirements may vary slightly from one field to another, all include collegiate-level laboratory courses in biology, general chemistry, organic chemistry, and physics, as well as courses in mathematics, social sciences, and humanities. In addition, upper-level courses, including genetics, cell biology, anatomy and physiology, and biochemistry, can significantly improve an applicant’s record. These basic requirements and the overall goals of a preprofessional education can be satisfied within a number of the Bachelor of Arts and Bachelor of Science major program described in this Bulletin.

Although most premedical professional students major in biology, chemistry, or the chemistry-biology joint program, they may select any departmental major as long as they satisfy the preprofessional school requirements. Students should contact the Premedical Professions advisor or a member of the Premedical Professions Advisory Committee as early as possible, preferably in the first year, for advice in planning their program of study.

The faculty of the College of Arts and Sciences supports the practice of referring to the Premedical Professions Advisory Committee all requests for letters of recommendation to health professional schools. Premedical professional students must complete the application process for an interview with the Premedical Professions Advisory Committee by the established deadline date in the spring of the junior year. The chair of the committee should be contacted for specific dates.

In cooperation with the New England College of Optometry in Boston, a unique opportunity exists for qualified students to receive the B.S. in biology and a Doctor of Optometry (O.D.) in seven years. The program allows the University of Hartford student to complete the fourth-year B.S. science requirements at the New England College of Optometry.

Applicants must be highly qualified high school seniors or beginning college students. If accepted into the program, they are expected to maintain a 3.0 overall minimum grade point average during their three years at the University of Hartford. Final admission to the New England College of Optometry is contingent upon successful completion of the first three years leading to a B.S. in biology, satisfactory optometry college admission test scores, and recommendation from the University of Hartford Premedical Professions Advisory Committee.

In cooperation with the University of Saint Joseph School of Pharmacy in Hartford, a unique opportunity exists for qualified students to receive the B.A. in biology or chemistry and a Doctor of Pharmacy (Pharm. D.) in seven years. The program allows the University of Hartford student to complete the fourth-year B.A. science requirements at the University of Saint Joseph School of Pharmacy.

Applicants must be highly qualified high school seniors or beginning college students. If accepted into the program, they are expected to maintain a 3.0 overall minimum grade point average during their three years at the University of Hartford. Final admission to the University of Saint Joseph School of Pharmacy is contingent upon successful completion of the first three years leading to a B.A. in biology or chemistry, satisfactory pharmacy college admission test scores, and recommendation from the University of Hartford Premedical Professions Advisory Committee.

Pre-Law Advising Program

The Pre-Law Advising program at the University of Hartford is designed to assist students considering law school as an option. The program structure affords students the opportunity to complete a major of their choice while being part of a learning community program focused on pursuing a career in law. A student organization, the Pre-Law Society, sponsors numerous social and educational events during the academic year.

Seven Pre-Law faculty advisors are available to work with students and their academic advisors to select courses of study designed to prepare them for the study of law while satisfying degree requirements for the baccalaureate. The committee also develops and periodically reviews a list of recommended courses for students interested in attending law school. The list contains courses that are identified by the committee as ones that develop skills established by the American Bar Association as important for a pre-law curriculum: analytic and problem-solving skills, critical reading abilities, writing skills, oral communication and listening abilities, general research skills, and the values of serving others and promoting justice.

For additional information, see the University Studies Pre-Law Advising Program 

University Scholar Program

This program permits a small number of selected students to depart from the specific requirements of a major program. Details regarding the nature of the University Scholar program and the criteria for enrollment in it are available at the Office of the Dean of the college.

Teacher Certification Program

For minors in teacher education (does not include certification on the undergraduate level), refer here . 

Study Abroad Program

Students are encouraged to study abroad during their time at the University.  For information about Study Abroad Programs, click here .

Washington Semester Program

The University of Hartford is affiliated with the Washington Semester Program through American University.  For further information, click here .

Academic Express

The College of Arts and Sciences’ Academic Express program was designed to meet the needs and concerns of nontraditional students who work full time, manage homes and families, and who need a college degree in order to increase their employment opportunities and earning potential. Academic Express is not simply an evening division of a day college. It is a comprehensive commitment to nontraditional students.

Undergraduate Study

The College of Arts and Sciences offers programs of study leading to the following degrees: Associate in Arts, Associate in Science, Bachelor of Arts, and Bachelor of Science.

Associate in Arts programs are offered in communication, humanities, and social sciences; Associate in Science programs in the biological and physical sciences. All associate’s degree programs include basic literacy requirements, distribution requirements, and a concentration in the degree area. All candidates for the associate’s degree must earn a minimum of 60 credits.

Programs leading to the Bachelor of Arts and the Bachelor of Science each include three components: general education requirements, a major program in a departmental field of specialization, and a number of elective courses. All candidates for the baccalaureate degree must earn a minimum of 120 credits.

Graduate Study

A program leading to a doctoral degree (Psy.D.) is offered by the Department of Psychology. Programs leading to a Master of Arts (M.A.) are offered by the School of Communication and Department of Psychology. A program leading to the Master of Science (M.S.) is offered by the Biology and Psychology departments. Complete program descriptions are available in the Graduate Bulletin.

Requirements for the A.A., A..S., B.A., and B.S. Degrees

General Education Requirements  

Undergraduate Major Programs

Bachelor of Arts (B.A.) Program

Major programs for the Bachelor of Arts degree are offered in biology, chemistry, cinema, communication, computer science, criminal justice, economics, English (literature and creative writing), gender studies, history, international studies, Judaic studies, mathematics, modern languages and cultures (French, Italian, Japanese, and Spanish), philosophy, physics, political economy, politics and government, rhetoric and professional writing, psychology, and sociology. Environmental studies is available to students as a contract major. Further details are available from the Office of the Dean.

The Bachelor of Arts consists of 120 credits, including general education and AUC requirements, a major, and electives.

Bachelor of Science (B.S.) Program

Major programs for the Bachelor of Science are offered in biology, chemistry, chemistry-biology, computer science, mathematics, and physics.

In general, the B.S. degree programs, while including a broad liberal arts background, are designed to prepare the student for professional employment or for graduate study in the sciences and health professional fields. The corresponding B.A. degree programs permit students greater flexibility in the choice of electives, allowing them to meet the demands of certain preprofessional programs or to prepare for careers in teaching.

The Bachelor of Science consists of 120 credits, including general education and AUC requirements, a major, and electives.

Double Degree Program

In certain instances it is possible for a student to complete the work for two separate bachelor’s degrees. A minimum of 150 credits is required, including the satisfactory completion of both major programs. For further information, students should consult the chairs of both departments and the Office of the Dean.

Double Degree Program with Engineering

For those students who desire to combine studies in Arts and Sciences with studies in engineering or other disciplines, the Double Degree program may be an appropriate means to provide a multidisciplinary program of studies. The combination of disciplines produces a particularly strong background for which employers have indicated a preference.

The College of Arts and Sciences has worked out a number of joint programs with the College of Engineering, Technology, and Architecture whereby a student may obtain two bachelor’s degrees, one in arts and sciences and one in engineering. The two degrees would be awarded simultaneously or sequentially upon satisfactory completion of the individual degree requirements. The Double Degree program requires a minimum of 150 credits, and in some instances may be completed in five years. Typical five-year programs include a Bachelor of Science in an engineering discipline, combined with a bachelor’s degree in mathematics or the sciences. The students’ programs are developed by working with advisors from both colleges.

Double degrees are also possible within the College of Arts and Sciences and with other colleges in addition to the College of Engineering, Technology, and Architecture. In the latter case, the students should consult the dean of Arts and Sciences and the dean of the other college to work out the details of the program.

Contract Majors

Environmental Studies, Environmental Sciences, and Other Interdisciplinary Contract Majors

The college is approved by the State of Connecticut to offer interdisciplinary contract majors.

This option allows students to design a program of study within an area of concentration that is not available through the traditional structure of the department major. Some of the programs that have been approved include environmental studies, environmental sciences, behavioral journalism, management and administrative psychology, medical illustration, and American studies.

All Arts and Sciences students who wish to pursue a contract major are invited to contact the Office of the Dean or the relevant department/school.

Major Requirements

The specific requirements for each of the B.A. and B.S. major programs are given in this Bulletin at the head of each section where the departmental/school course offerings are listed.

Students must obtain the approval of their program chairs before they can be classified as majors in any program, and the program must be approved by program advisors.

For the B.A. and B.S. degrees, all students must satisfy the course requirements established by the major department or school, in addition to the general education requirements of the College of Arts and Sciences. Overlapping is both possible and permissible, so that certain courses may serve to satisfy both the major and the general education requirements.

Writing Requirement

Each program has established a writing requirement satisfied by completing one or more courses (at the 200 level or above) required for the major and designated with a “W” (writing intensive). Students in such courses are expected to produce a substantial quantity of writing (term papers, problem sets, museum papers, etc.), which will be read, commented on, and evaluated by at least one faculty member or an officially designated aide, and will be returned in time to allow for revision and reevaluation.

Declaration of Major

Students may announce their intended major at the time they apply for admission to the University. Students may not proceed beyond the end of the sophomore year without declaring their majors and being accepted by the programs. Students wishing to declare a double major should consult their academic advisor and the Office of the Dean. Forms for declaring majors are available in the Office of the Dean of the college.

Declaration of Minor (Optional)

Students may announce their intended minor at the time of application for admission to the University or at any time prior to, but not after, the end of the junior year. Acceptance by the program is required. Specific information regarding each minor may be obtained from the respective program heads.

Additional Electives

In addition to credits required in general education and major, a student completes the remaining credits in unrestricted electives for a minimum total of 120 academic credits. Among these, however, a student may take no more than 2 credits in physical education (PE 110 , PE 111 ). 

Major and Minor Programs and Course Descriptions

The course numbering system is described here .

Not all of the courses listed in the Bulletin are offered each year. Offerings for each semester, and for the summer sessions, are listed in the class schedules, which are available during each registration period in the Office of Student Academic Services of the College of Arts and Sciences. The University reserves the right to make changes in academic programs.

First-Year Seminar

FYS 100 - First-Year Seminar


The first-year seminar is a low-enrollment, introductory-level topics course on a subject or question in the discipline that the professor presents to the class in order to model and instill intellectual passion. Students experience small-group interaction and refine the skills associated with discussion and deliberation of ideas and alternative viewpoints. The classroom format is Socratic: It includes ample time for discussion, sometimes in small groups, and students are required to represent their critical thinking verbally. Typically, an advanced undergraduate in the professor’s discipline acts as preceptor for the students and helps them learn study and writing skills. The course satisfies a writing-intensive requirement when listed as FYS 100W .


Click here for Spring 2017 course scheduling information.

Click here for Fall 2017 course scheduling information.


Honors Program in the College of Arts and Sciences

The College of Arts and Sciences participates in the University-wide Honors program, which is open to all qualified students. Throughout students’ four years, the program makes available courses that are enriched, innovative, and generally smaller in size than other classes. Qualified first-year students may complete some of their general education requirements by taking special honors sections. Upper-level interdisciplinary honors seminars are also offered, as is the Humanities Center Seminar. In their junior and senior years, students who plan to graduate with honors have two options: pursuing Honors Thesis Research and writing an Honors Thesis, or completing a special Honors Research Project in an honors seminar or an upper-level course in the major. The proposal for the Honors Research Project must be approved by the Arts and Sciences Honors Committee, and the completed project must be approved by either a member of the Honors Committee or a designated faculty member with expertise in the project’s field. Guidelines and information about the Honors Program are available from the coordinator of the Arts and Sciences Honors Program. The Honors Program is administered by a faculty committee appointed by the dean.

Honors Designation

Students completing a minimum of 18 credit hours of honors work approved by the University Honors program will graduate with a University honors designation on their diploma. There are two honors tracks: Honors with Thesis and Honors. The Honors with Thesis track typically includes

  • 6 credits of honors sections of general education courses, AUC courses, or contract honors
  • 6 credits of honors seminars
  • 6 credits of Honors Research/Honors Thesis

Students majoring in the natural sciences may substitute a 3-credit, upper-division contract honors course for 3 credits of seminar work.

Transfer students with junior status or above and a GPA of at least 3.25 at their last institution may earn the University Honors with Thesis designation with a total of 12 credits by completing two seminars (or for natural science students, one seminar and upper-division contract honors course) and the 6-credit thesis. To graduate with University honors, these students must meet the following GPA requirements for their work at the University of Hartford: 3.0 in honors work and 3.25 overall. Alternatively, transfer students with sophomore standing or above and a GPA of 3.25 may count up to 6 credits of honors work taken at their last institution toward their University of Hartford honors degree with the approval of the A&S Honors Committee.

The Honors (non-thesis) track typically includes

  • 6 credits of honors sections of general education courses, AUC courses, or contract honors
  • 9 credits of honors seminars
  • 3 credits of either
    1. a 300-level honors seminar taken in the senior year in which the student completes an Honors Research Project on the course topic via honors contract (with prior approval from the A&S Honors Committee), or
    2. an upper-level course in the student’s major (including independent study or internship, as appropriate) in which the student completes an Honors Research Project via honors contract (with prior approval from the A&S Honors Committee).

Students may substitute one or two 3-credit, upper-division contract honors courses for 3-6 credits of seminar work.

Transfer students with junior status or above and a GPA of at least 3.25 at their last institution may earn the University Honors designation with a total of 12 credits by completing three seminars (or for natural science students, one seminar and two upper-division contract honors courses) and the 3-credit Honors Research Project in either an honors seminar or an upper-division contract honors course. To graduate with University honors, these students must meet the following GPA requirements for their work at the University of Hartford: 3.0 in honors work, 3.25 overall. Alternatively, transfer students with sophomore standing or above and a GPA of 3.25 may count up to 6 credits of honors work taken at their last institution toward their University of Hartford honors degree with the approval of the A&S Honors Committee.

Students in both tracks must have a grade point average of at least 3.0 in their honors work and must maintain an overall 3.25 in order to graduate with University Honors. Interested students should submit a form declaring their intention to pursue an honors degree after the completion of 3-9 credits of honors work. This form may be obtained from the Arts and Sciences honors coordinator or from the college’s evaluator and must be signed by the honors coordinator of the college. All forms and information may be obtained from the A&S honors coordinator.

Departmental Honors

Some departments in the college (e.g., Biology, Computer Science, Mathematics, Philosophy, Physics, and Psychology) offer students the opportunity to do advanced work in their majors, resulting in departmental honors. A student who wants to graduate with University Honors and who has fulfilled all the requirements except the thesis may submit to the Arts and Sciences Honors Committee an Honors Thesis proposal that is based on departmental honors work. The proposal and the thesis then have to pass through the stipulated review-and-approval process established by the A&S Honors Committee for an Honors Thesis.

Types of Honors Offerings

Honors Sections (100- to 200-level courses) Enriched and/or accelerated sections of regularly scheduled, introductory-level courses, or courses required or likely to be taken under the general education requirements of the College of Arts and Sciences. The standard for admission to these courses is determined by the Arts and Sciences Honors Committee.

Honors Seminars (300-level courses) Enriched and/or accelerated special-topic seminars. These advanced seminars assume some knowledge of a discipline. The standard of admission to these seminars is determined by the Arts and Sciences Honors Committee.

Honors Thesis (400-level courses) For Arts and Sciences honors students completing the Honors Thesis Track, thesis research, supervised by a full-time Arts and Sciences faculty member, is typically undertaken in preparation for submitting an Honors Thesis Proposal. The proposal must be approved in advance by the Arts and Sciences Honors Program Committee. Once this approval is obtained, the student may register for Honors Thesis. Detailed instructions on the preparation of an Honors Thesis may be obtained from the honors coordinator. The thesis itself must be approved by the thesis advisor and two additional readers, one designated by the thesis advisor and the other by the A&S Honors Committee. Prerequisites: Junior or senior standing, 3.25 overall average, and 3.0 average in all honors courses.

Non-thesis Honors Arts and Sciences honors students pursuing the Non-thesis Honors Track must complete, during the senior year, an Honors Research Project in either an upper-level honors seminar or an upper-level course in the major. Students are advised to make these arrangements early, preferably in the semester before the course takes place, in consultation with the Arts and Sciences Honors Committee and the course instructor. The project proposal must be approved in advance by the Arts and Sciences Honors Program Committee, and is read by both the course instructor and a second reader (either a member of the A&S Honors Committee or an expert in the field, designated by the committee). Prerequisites: Junior or senior standing, 3.25 overall average, and 3.0 average in all honors courses.

Fall 2015 Honors Courses

Students who qualify for honors courses are notified by mail. Honors course offerings vary from year to year. The Schedule of Classes for any semester contains a listing of that semester’s offerings.

HON 160 Discover America III: 1945-Present 3 credits
HON 160 Romanticism in the Arts 3 credits
HON 170 Power and Politics in America 3 credits
HON 172 Introduction to Philosophy 3 credits
HON 173 Introduction to Psychology 3 credits
HON 181 Introduction to Communication 3 credits
HON 182 Academic Writing I 3 credits
HON 187 Aspects of Art 3 credits
HON 210 Foundations of Argument 3 credits
HON 280W Introduction to Literature 3 credits
HON 383 Israeli Culture and Conflict 3 credits
HON 384 Modalities of Freedom and Vicissitudes of Hope 3 credits
HON 385 Illness Stories 3 credits
HON 389 Humanities Center Seminar: Remembering 9/11 3 credits
HON 493 Honors Research 3 credits
HON 494 Honors Thesis Writing 3 credits