Aug 08, 2020  
2012-2013 Undergraduate Bulletin 
    
2012-2013 Undergraduate Bulletin [ARCHIVED BULLETIN]

General Information



The University of Hartford offers a variety of academic programs available at few universities of its size yet strives to foster individual attention. With more than 4,500 full-time undergraduate students, the campus is large enough to achieve the goals of a University without becoming a massive, impersonal institution. Many opportunities for career preparation can be realized within the 84 bachelor’s degree programs, 11 associate’s degrees, 38 graduate degrees, and 5 certificates or diplomas offered by the University.

Bachelor’s degree programs are offered in the College of Arts and Sciences; the Barney School of Business; the College of Education, Nursing and Health Professions; the College of Engineering, Technology, and Architecture; the professional schools of art (Hartford Art School) and performing arts (The Hartt School); and University Studies. Two-year associate’s degree programs are offered in the College of Arts and Sciences; Hillyer College; the College of Engineering, Technology, and Architecture; the College of Education, Nursing and Health Professions, and University Studies. Transfer opportunities to the baccalaureate programs are available for associate’s degree graduates. Noncredit programs are offered by the Center for Professional Development and The Hartt School Community Division.

Master’s degree programs are offered in the College of Arts and Sciences; the Barney School of Business; the College of Education, Nursing and Health Professions; the College of Engineering, Technology, and Architecture; the Hartford Art School, and The Hartt School.

Sixth-Year Certificate programs are offered by the College of Education, Nursing and Health Professions and The Hartt School. The Barney School of Business also offers certificate programs in the major business disciplines.

The Doctoral Program in Clinical Psychology is offered by the College of Arts and Sciences; the degrees of Doctor of Education and Doctor of Physical Therapy are offered by the College of Education, Nursing and Health Professions; and the degrees of Doctor of Musical Arts and Doctor of Philosophy are offered by The Hartt School.

All degree programs of the University of Hartford carry regional and state accreditation or licensure.

Students who are highly motivated to seek a college education are welcome. Student opinions are respected. In turn, the students are expected to respect the rights of other members of the college community. The University is committed to the concept of a free, democratic spirit of inquiry and discussion on campus. Close student-faculty contacts are encouraged by keeping the average class size small and by stressing the importance of teaching.

Students may pursue programs that cut across departmental lines and involve more than one school. Opportunities for independent study have also been expanded.

All faculty and staff at the University of Hartford are keenly aware of the challenges facing students and alumni as a consequence of the rapid evolution of today’s global economy. The University aims to produce graduates who possess the skills and credentials to achieve satisfying careers, and to this end, there is close cooperation between the Office of Career Services and faculty academic advisors and internship coordinators. Students are encouraged to make an appointment early in their course of study with a career counselor in the Office of Career Services to begin exploring potential occupational outcomes.

The University of Hartford was chartered on February 21, 1957, as a university for the Hartford community.  It merged three existing schools; the Hartford Art School (1877), Hillyer College (1879), and The Hartt School (1920), all well-recognized institutions of higher education to form the University of Hartford. The University is an independent, coeducational, nonsectarian institution. The variety of its programs attracts a diverse student body from the urban and general metropolitan area, from 45 states of the Union, and currently, from 58 foreign countries. In addition to full-time undergraduate students, more than 2,300 others are enrolled in part-time undergraduate and graduate programs and noncredit courses.

The University of Hartford, an independent institution, is supported by its fees and by the gifts of alumni, friends, corporations, and foundations.

It is governed by a self-perpetuating board of regents, of which the president of the University is a member. Faculty, students, and alumni are represented on the board of regents.

Accreditation and Memberships

The University of Hartford is accredited by the Board of Higher Education of the State of Connecticut and by the New England Association of Schools and Colleges, which accredits schools and colleges in the six New England states. Membership in the association indicates that the institution has been carefully evaluated and found to meet standards agreed upon by qualified educators.

Five health professions programs in the College of Education, Nursing and Health Professions are accredited by the following agencies: the Clinical Laboratory Science/Medical Technology program by the National Accrediting Agency for Clinical Laboratory Sciences (NAACLS), 8410 West Bryn Mawr Ave., Suite 670, Chicago, IL 60631-3415, tel. 773.714.8880; the Radiography program by the Joint Review Committee on Education in Radiologic Technology (JRCERT), 20 North Wacker Dr., Suite 900, Chicago, IL 60606- 2901, tel. 312.704.5300; and the Respiratory Care program by the Commission on Accreditation for Respiratory Care (CoARC), 1248 Harwood Rd., Bedford, TX 76021-4244, tel. 817.283.2835. The Physical Therapy program is accredited by the Commission on Accreditation in Physical Therapy Education (CAPTE) of the American Physical Therapy Association, 111 North Fairfax St., Alexandria, VA 22314, tel. 703.706.3245. The foundational curriculum for the Master of Science in Prosthetics and Orthotics is fully accredited by the Commission on Accreditation of Allied Health Educational Programs (CAAHEP), 1361 Park Street, Clearwater, FL 33756, tel. 727.210.2350. The program was approved by the Department of Higher Education, State of Connecticut, in 2009. Upon completion of the program requirements, students are eligible for their two-year professional residency.

The Nursing program in the College of Education, Nursing and Health Professions through the master’s degree is accredited by the Commission on Collegiate Nursing Education, One Dupont Circle, NW, Suite 530, Washington, DC 20036-1120, tel. 202.887.6971.

The Department of Nursing belongs to the following organizations: the American Association of Colleges of Nursing (AACN), the National League for Nursing (NLN), and the Connecticut League for Nursing (CLN).

The teacher education program, including teacher education in music, through the Sixth-Year Certificate, is accredited by the National Council for the Accreditation of Teacher Education and by the Connecticut State Department of Education.

In the College of Arts and Sciences, the Doctor of Psychology program leading to the Doctor of Psychology (Psy.D.) in Clinical Psychology is fully accredited by the American Psychological Association. Any questions regarding the program’s accreditation may be directed to Office of Program Consultation and Accreditation, American Psychological Association, 750 First St., NE, Washington, DC 20002-4242; 202.336.5979. The School Psychology program is nationally accredited through the National Association of School Psychologists and National Council for the Accreditation of Teacher Education partnership (NASP/NCATE). The Department of Chemistry is included in the list of departments approved by the American Chemical Society. The Bachelor of Science (B.S.) program is designed to meet the standards set by the Committee on Professional Training of the American Chemical Society, and students who complete the B.S. program will be certified to the A.C.S. upon graduation.

The University Studies Paralegal Studies and Paralegal Certificate programs are approved by the American Bar Association.

The Hartford Art School is accredited by and holds membership in the National Association of Schools of Art and Design.

The Hartt School is accredited by and holds membership in the National Association of Schools of Music, the National Association of Schools of Theatre, and the National Association of Schools of Dance.

All programs in the College of Engineering, Technology, and Architecture are licensed and accredited by the State of Connecticut Board of Higher Education. The following programs in the college are accredited by the Engineering Accreditation Commission (EAC) of the Accreditation Board for Engineering and Technology (ABET): Bachelor of Science in Engineering degree in Biomedical Engineering, Bachelor of Science in Civil Engineering, Bachelor of Science in Computer Engineering, Bachelor of Science in Electrical Engineering, and Bachelor of Science in Mechanical Engineering. Contact ABET at 111 Market Place, Suite 1050, Baltimore, MD 21202-4012; 410.347.7700; www.abet.org. The Associate in Science in Electronic Engineering Technology and the Bachelor of Science programs in Electronic Engineering Technology, Architectural Engineering Technology, and Mechanical Engineering Technology are accredited by the Technology Accreditation Commission (TAC) of ABET. Contact ABET at 111 Market Place, Suite 1050, Baltimore, MD 21202-4012; 410.347.7700; www.abet.org. The Master of Architecture program is accredited by the National Architectural Accrediting Board (NAAB) 1735 New York Avenue, NW, Washington, DC 2006; www.naab.org.

The Board of Higher Education of the State of Connecticut accredits the College of Engineering, Technology, and Architecture’s Master of Engineering programs. According to ABET regulations, ABET does not accredit both undergraduate and graduate programs at the same institution.

The University is a member of the American Society for Engineering Education (ASEE) and the Association of Collegiate Schools of Architecture (ACSA).

The Barney School of Business holds membership in, and is accredited by, AACSB International—the Association to Advance Collegiate Schools of Business. AACSB International accreditation represents the highest standard of achievement for business schools worldwide. Institutions that earn accreditation confirm their commitment to quality and continuous improvement through a rigorous and comprehensive peer review. AACSB International accreditation is the hallmark of excellence in management education. AACSB International accreditation assures stakeholders that business schools

  • manage resources to achieve a vibrant and relevant mission, advance business and management knowledge through faculty scholarship,
  • provide high-caliber teaching of quality and current curricula,
  • cultivate meaningful interaction between students and a qualified faculty, and
  • produce graduates who have achieved specified learning goals.

The University is an institutional member of the Council of Graduate Schools in the United States.

Mission of the University of Hartford

 As a private university with a public purpose, we engage students in acquiring the knowledge, skills, and values necessary to thrive in, and contribute to, a pluralistic, complex world.

Academic Mission

Our academic community of faculty, staff, and students forms a dynamic, interdisciplinary learning environment htat arises from outstanding teaching, innovative research, scholarship, and creative attainment.  We are committed to the personal attention associated with a small college, enhanced by the expertise, breadth, and intellectual excitement of a university.  Diversity of every sort is integral to our academic mission, along with connections to local, national, and global communities.

Values Statement

At the University of Hartford we are committed to community. We are an academic community that values integrity, curiosity, creativity, excellence, responsibility, and accomplishment. Enriched by our diversity and our engagement with one another, we take pride in our shared traditions and experiences. We are dedicated to building a culture that respects all of its members and celebrates their contributions as we work together to strengthen our community.

Statement of Nondiscriminatory Policies

Consistent with the requirements of Title IX of the Education Amendments of 1972, as amended, the University does not discriminate on the basis of gender in the conduct or operation of its educational programs or activities, including employment therein and admission thereto. The University admits students without regard to race, gender, creed, color, age, physical ability, sexual orientation, or national or ethnic origin to all the rights, privileges, programs, and activities generally accorded or made available to students at the University. It complies with Title VI of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, as amended, and does not discriminate on the basis of race, gender, creed, color, age, physical ability, sexual orientation, or national or ethnic origin in the administration of its educational policies, admission policies, scholarship and loan programs, and athletics and other University-administered programs. The University of Hartford hereby provides notice to its students, employees, applicants, and others that it supports the language and intent of the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) and Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 (and regulations issued pursuant thereto), which prohibits discrimination on the basis of disability in its educational programs and activities, including admission to and access to the University.

The dean of students (Gengras Student Union, 860.768.4260) is the individual designated to coordinate efforts by the University to comply with and carry out requirements under Title IX and Section 504.

Inquiries concerning the application of Title IX, Section 504, and Title VI may be referred to the Regional Director, Office of Civil Rights, U.S. Department of Education, Boston, MA 02109.

Drug and Alcohol Policy Statement

The University complies with the requirements of the Federal Drug-Free Workplace Act of 1988 and the Federal Drug-Free Schools and Communities Amendments of 1989. The University subscribes to the guidelines recommended by the Connecticut state Department of Higher Education for the elimination of drug and alcohol abuse in the educational environment.

The manufacture, distribution, dispensing, possession or use of controlled substances is prohibited on the campus of the University of Hartford. The Connecticut General Statutes impose severe penalties for violations. Under Section 21a-277, the illegal manufacture, distribution, sale, prescription, and/or dispensing of any controlled substance, for a first offense, could result in imprisonment for not more than 15 years and a fine of up to $50,000. Subsequent offenses carry even harsher penalties. Section 21a-278 carries additional penalties, including the possibility of life imprisonment.

The manufacture, unsanctioned/unlawful distribution, dispensing, possession, or use of alcoholic beverages is prohibited on the campus of the University of Hartford. University employees, students, and guests are expected to comply with all laws and regulations governing alcoholic beverages, including laws prohibiting the furnishing or serving of alcoholic beverages to minors. The sale of alcoholic beverages, except as permitted by law, is prohibited by the state of Connecticut. Penalties for violating this law could include, for each offense, a fine of up to $1,000 and/or imprisonment for up to one year. Sale to minors is also prohibited and carries penalties of up to $15,000 and/or imprisonment of up to 18 months. Relevant sections of the Connecticut General Statute include Sections 30-74, 30-77, 30-86, 30-87, 30-88a, 30-89, and 30-113.

University Statement on Diversity

As an institution of higher learning, the University of Hartford strives to be more than merely a mirror of the larger society: it fosters learning and encourages the personal growth of students in an environment that promotes and celebrates diversity. Accordingly, our goals are

  • to become an open, honest, disciplined, and caring community where the unique qualities of each person are fully appreciated;
  • to create on the campus a community reasonably reflective of the racial and other diversity of the larger society, but in which that diversity is managed and supported for the benefit of all; and
  • to balance the rights of individuals and the concerns of the institution, so that all of our members are treated with respect and the larger goals of the University are fully understood.

Each student, faculty member, and member of the staff deserves the full respect and courteous treatment of other members of the University family, regardless of race, gender, age, religion, national origin, disability, or sexual orientation.

Institutional efforts to promote community imply certain expectations regarding the behavior of members of the community. We do not tolerate acts of incivility, bigotry, violence, racial or sexual harassment, or substance abuse. Conduct counter to these expectations is considered to be a serious offense against our community and the rights of its members and will be dealt with severely.

The Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act of 1974

The University complies with the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA), which affords students certain rights with respect to their education records:

  1. The right to inspect and review the student’s education records within 45 days of the day the University receives a request for access. Students should submit to the registrar, dean, head of the academic department, or other appropriate official, written requests that identify the record(s) they wish to inspect. The University official will make arrangements for access and notify the student of the time and place where the records may be inspected. If the records are not maintained by the official to whom the request was submitted, that official shall advise the student of the correct person to whom the request should be addressed.
  2. The right to request the amendment of the student’s education records that the student believes are inaccurate or misleading.

Students may ask the University to amend a record that they believe is inaccurate or misleading. They should write the University official responsible for the record, clearly identify the part of the record they want changed, and specify why it is inaccurate or misleading.

If the University decides not to amend the record as requested by the student, the University will notify the student of the decision and advise the student of his or her right to a hearing regarding the request for amendment. Additional information regarding the hearing procedures will be provided to the student when notified of the right to a hearing.

  1. The right to consent to disclosures of personally identifiable information contained in the student’s education records, except to the extent that FERPA authorizes disclosure without consent.

One exception that permits disclosure without consent is disclosure to University officials with legitimate educational interests. A University official is a person employed by the University in an administrative, supervisory, academic, research, or support staff position, including law enforcement unit personnel and health staff; a person or company with whom the University has contracted, such as an attorney, auditor, or collection agent; a person serving on the board of regents; or a student serving on an official committee, such as a disciplinary or grievance committee, or assisting another school official in performing his or her task.

A University official has a legitimate educational interest if he/she needs to review an education record in order to fulfill his or her professional responsibility.

The Act allows the University to issue “directory information.” This would include name, address, telephone number, dates of attendance, degrees and awards received, major field of study, and similar information. Any student objecting to the release of directory information should bring this to the attention of the registrar. Upon written notification, the directory information will be withheld.

  1. The right to file a complaint with the U.S. Department of Education concerning alleged failures by the University to comply with the requirements of FERPA. The name and address of the office that administers FERPA are Family Policy Compliance Office, U.S. Department of Education, 600 Independence Ave., SW, Washington, DC 20202-4605.

Life at the University

The University emphasizes three cardinal elements: superior teaching by a strong, well-trained faculty; a personal interest in total development of the individual student; and a warm-hearted spirit among students, staff, and faculty. Students pursue their studies in an atmosphere that is conducive to growth, both academic and personal. Classes are intellectually free and stimulating; most are small enough to permit a close relationship between student and teacher.

The academic program is paramount. In addition, opportunities are provided for the broadening of interests and social relationships, for leadership and service, for participation in a constructive sports and recreation program, and for the building of lasting friendships.

Cultural Opportunities

The University of Hartford has gained a wide reputation for the quality of cultural activities and fine arts exhibitions that take place on campus. More than 400 performances in the form of student and faculty concerts, theatre, and dance productions are presented at The Hartt School for the enjoyment of the Greater Hartford public and the University community. The Joseloff Gallery of the Hartford Art School exhibits works by student, faculty, and guest artists; conducts a visiting artist program; and presents films, workshops, and other special events.

University Players, the student theatre group, presents stage productions in the fall and spring. Outstanding films are screened frequently during the academic year. In addition, the University offers lecture series, debates, seminars, and special exhibitions.

The many fine resources of Connecticut’s capital region are available for the development of the students’ cultural and intellectual interests. These include excellent libraries, museums, theaters, and symphony orchestras. A progressive and rapidly growing urban center, Hartford also provides students with many opportunities to participate in community services.

Student Participation in Governance and Cocurricular Activities

Student Government Association. The student governing body, which represents all full-time, tuition-based, undergraduate students, is the Student Government Association, Gengras Student Union, telephone 860.768.4775. Through it, the students join in developing and coordinating the cocurricular activities of the University. Students are also represented on the major administrative committees of the University and on its board of regents. They are involved in the process of planning for the future as well as working to ensure a sound program while they are on campus.

There are many active organizations on the campus. These range from special interest groups in government, international relations, and psychology, to those with wider focus concerning social, political, and religious interests, as well as national and local social, honorary, and professional fraternities.

All University students are encouraged to participate in an extensive program of physical education, including intercollegiate and intramural athletics.

Student publications include a weekly newspaper, a literary and art magazine, a yearbook, and a student directory.

Student Association Lawyer. Consultative services of an experienced lawyer are available without charge to undergraduate students, as an SGA-sponsored program.

Tutoring Programs.  The Student Success Center’s TutorZone program provides free, one-on-one tutoring for undergraduate students with University of Hartford students who have received an A or A- in the course and who have recommendations from their professors and/or advisors.  To request a tutor or to become a tutor, visit the Student Success Center, located behind B Complex across from Hawk Hall.  (See also the Center for Reading and Writing, Learning Plus, and the Math Tutoring Lab.)

Code of Student Conduct. All University of Hartford students possess certain rights and privileges together with corresponding duties and responsibilities. Every student is entitled to freedom of action as a necessary expression of scholarly activity. Each individual is due respect of his/her personal dignity and property. In turn, he/she is responsible for maintaining standards of conduct that do not interfere with the rights of others or with the effective functioning of the University as a center of inquiry and learning.

Students are admitted to the University with the understanding that they accept the University’s basic principles and codes of behavior. Violations of University regulations will result in appropriate penalties, including suspension or expulsion from the University. The student handbook, The Source, is issued by the Student Affairs Office, and this handbook contains both the Academic Honesty Policy and the University Code of Student Conduct.

Student Conduct. The University Code of Student Conduct addresses conduct violations that are not academic. Through this code students are held accountable for their behavior. The code provides for boards that hear violations of the University’s Code of Student Conduct. The code also clearly states judicial policies and procedures.

Academic Honesty. The purpose of the academic honesty policy is to provide a clear statement to students and faculty of the University’s expectations regarding academic honesty and to set forth procedures for the enforcement of this policy.

University of Hartford Residence Hall Regulations. The statement of policy concerning the University’s Code of Student Conduct applies to all residential situations. Students are expected to abide by policies set forth in The Source and the Housing Contract. The Code of Student Conduct is monitored by residence hall staff and enforced by the University’s Judicial System. Community, state, and federal laws apply in the complexes and Hawk Hall; Village, Regents Park, and Park River Apartments; and the Asylum Avenue residence halls.

Office of Student Affairs

A professional staff headed by the vice president for student affairs directs a variety of services and programs designed to complement the academic experience and to provide personalized support toward the student’s individual development. Included are the following:

Center for Community Service. The Center for Community Service promotes civic responsibility and enhances the educational process through active participation in community service programs and academic service-learning experiences.

The center assists students and faculty in integrating service-learning into the academic experience, develops collaborative partnerships with community agencies and service organizations, and establishes and promotes community service opportunities for individuals, groups, and classes.

The Center for Community Service is located in Gengras Student Union (room 209).

Office of Residential Life. The University housing facilities are designed and staffed to provide a community experience that will support and enrich the academic pursuits of the students. In each residential area there is a full-time professional who is the administrator for the area. This staff member supervises the support staff of trained undergraduate and graduate resident assistants and resident directors. The administrative office is staffed by a director of residential life, an associate director, and two assistant directors. The Office of Residential Life is under the direction of the vice president of student affairs and dean of students. The staff is available for counsel, advice, and information.

A Residence Hall Association provides a self-governance program within the system and an active schedule of social and educational programming.

For further information about the physical facilities of the residential areas, see below.

Health Services. Health Services are available on campus for all full-time undergraduate students and for those part-time students paying the Health Services fee. Students are required to submit an immunization form prior to their arrival on campus.

The University of Hartford and Connecticut state law require that all matriculating students enrolled who were born after 12/31/56 must be protected against measles, mumps, and rubella (MMR). Immunization records showing proof of two doses of measles (the first administered on/after 1/1/69 and on/after the first birthday and the second on/after 1/1/80), one dose of rubella (administered after the first birthday) and one dose of mumps (administered after the first birthday) are required to be sent to Health Services. (Those students born after 1980 still must show proof of two doses.) The disease history is not acceptable. Laboratory evidence of an immune titer is acceptable. MMR vaccines are available at Health Services.

These medical immunization forms are essential, and students not in compliance will not be allowed to register for classes after the first semester. In addition, residential students are required to submit documentation of immunization against meningococcal infection.

The physicians in Health Services see patients on campus by appointment and are on call at all times when Health Services is open during the fall and spring semesters while classes are in session. During these times, Health Services is staffed on site by nurse practitioners and staff nurses to handle medical problems. The University has excellent arrangements with nearby hospitals and physicians to provide for more serious emergencies and extended care.

University Physical Therapy, LLC, a private-practice corporation, located in the Health Services area, is open to the public and the University community for referrals. The clinic is also used by degree candidates in physical therapy for their integrated clinical experiences.

Health Insurance. The Health Services fee includes an accident insurance policy. For further information, please contact the current agent, Willis of Connecticut, LLC, at 800.624.4184, ext. 45391, or 860.756.7391. Insurance claim forms are available at Health Services. It is the student’s responsibility to submit all claims. A health insurance policy covering medical and surgical hospitalization is available to students on an optional basis. It is strongly urged that students not fully covered provide themselves with this coverage at the low student rate. Details are available in the Office of Student Affairs. Full-time international undergraduate students are required to carry the University of Hartford accident and sickness insurance while enrolled at the University.

Counseling and Psychological Services offers a variety of psychological services to students at the University of Hartford. Short-term individual, couples, and group counseling are available for students who need and want help with personal, social, academic and emotional problems. For those students who require specialized or long-term services, the Counseling and Psychological Services staff can arrange appropriate referrals to other professional agencies off campus.

All counseling is confidential. Appointments are made by calling or stopping by the Counseling and Psychological Services office in Gengras Student Union, room 313.

Connections Health Education and Wellness Center. Located in room 116 on the lower level of University Commons, is Connections Health Education and Wellness Center, a comprehensive health promotion service for the University of Hartford campus community. The center offers programming and presentations on a wide variety of issues pertinent to students at this stage of their development, as well as health and wellness resources, an extensive library of books and professional journals, and an informative, user-friendly website: www.hartford.edu/wellness. In its role as a drop-in center where students can access information, talk with a professional, or find support from a peer, the center promotes a holistic living and learning atmosphere that is fun, comfortable, and informative for students, faculty, and staff.

Women and Gender Resource Center. The University of Hartford Women and Gender Resource Center is located on the first level of the Gengras Student Union. The mission of the center is to promote an atmosphere of empowerment through education, activism, and advocacy, as well as to foster a community equitable for all people. This mission is accomplished through campus and community outreach, educational programming and resources, and providing a safe, supportive, and accessible space for both women and men. The Women and Gender Resource Center encourages and facilitates student involvement with the local community by providing students an opportunity to supplement their academic knowledge with practical experience and to develop a sense of civic responsibility. The center is home to a extensive resource library with a collection of books, periodicals, and Web resources to provide current information on a variety of issues relevant to student life.

The Student Success Center (SSC), located behind B Complex across from Hawk Hall, is where students can come to arrange for one-on-one tutoring, have their questions answered, get advice, share concerns or frustrations, learn about upcoming activities, get connected with programming and leadership opportunities on campus, or just hang out in a friendly and supportive location.

The SSC staff provides the resources and support necessary for students to have a successful, enjoyable, and rewarding academic and social experience at the University. This includes connecting students with tutors, information, guidance, and referrals in such areas as study skills, academic support services, mental health and wellness, career exploration and internships, financial aid and scholarships, campus life, intramural athletics, and reminders about important deadlines. SSC staff also help students get involved in clubs and organizations so that they can become an integral part of the University community.

The Student Success Center is a drop-in center with no appointment needed. For assistance, stop by the center, call 860.768.7003, or e-mail ssc@hartford.edu. Find additional information on the SSC website, www.hartford.edu/ssc.

Career Services. Career advising and assistance in selecting a major, as well as in finding professional work, internships, and student employment are available to all full-time and part-time matriculated students, with many services also available to alumni. Early exploration of career fields is encouraged through a wide range of workshops and programs, internships, online and printed career resources, self-assessment tools, and individual sessions with career advisors.

Various programs and services exist to assist students in obtaining employment after graduation. These programs include on-campus and off-campus interviews and information sessions for students, career fairs, online job and internship databases, and seminars and workshops on practical topics, such as interviewing skills, résumé writing, and job search strategies. Many informational and employment resources are available through the Career Services website at www.hartford.edu/career. Career Services is located in Gengras Student Union, room 309.

Student Employment. Career Services also provides assistance to enrolled students seeking part-time, summer, or temporary employment to help meet their educational expenses and to gain work experience. On- and off-campus positions are listed online, through the University’s CareerBridge system at www.hartford.edu/career.

Internships. Internships and cooperative education opportunities assist students in integrating academic study with related professional training. Supervised by faculty advisors, such experiences allow students to explore career possibilities and to make informed career decisions by applying classroom learning in a workplace environment. In addition, many internships offer a stipend or salary, enabling students to help defray the cost of a college education. These learning experiences always involve three parties: the student, the employer, and the student’s internship supervisor (a faculty member designated by the student’s school or college). It is the student’s responsibility to ensure that academic credit for such experiences is approved by the appropriate internship supervisor.

The Office of Career Services assists students and their academic advisors in finding internships and cooperative education opportunities that meet the requirements of participating academic programs. An online database of identified experiential education or internship opportunities is included in the University’s CareerBridge service and may be found at the Career Services website, www.hartford.edu/career.

For more information, contact Career Services at 860.768.4287, GSU 309.

International Center. The International Center provides specialized services to international students and scholars. It is also an information resource for American students.

The primary role of the International Center is to assist international students in their successful adjustment to living in a new culture. Assistance is provided through interpreting U.S. social customs, explaining the educational system, and addressing personal concerns (e.g., finances, health, schooling for dependents, housing, language, academic skills) directly or by referral to the appropriate office. The center sponsors social events; assists in organizing an annual, campus wide, international culture program; advises a number of international student groups; and provides a special section of the orientation program for international students.

Programs that strengthen international understanding are organized by the center itself or, if presented by another group, supported and promoted. The center directly assists international student groups wishing to present programs that will help the University community better understand other lands and cultures.

The center also organizes workshops and training sessions to help international students and Americans in the University community learn from one another. For a complete listing of programs and resources, please consult www.hartford.edu/intcenter.

Office of Multicultural Programs. The Office of Multicultural Programs has a commitment to promote understanding, appreciation, and respect for diversity on campus and in the community at large. It provides services and programs to help students of color realize their full academic potential. The Office of Multicultural Programs actively reaches out to African American, Asian American, Native American, West Indian, Puerto Rican, and Latino students, through programs and activities that will assist in their transition to the campus.

The Office of Multicultural Programs provides a variety of supportive services designed to help students of color adjust socially and academically to the University. These services include (a) support and general assistance in adjustment to campus life; (b) sponsoring/cosponsoring seminars and workshops covering topics pertinent to today’s University student; (c) information regarding scholarship resources available to assist in financing a student’s education; (d) ongoing contact with students and assessment of needs and concerns, with referrals made to appropriate campus resources. Students are also encouraged to form study groups and utilize tutoring services as needed.

In order to foster cross-cultural awareness, interaction, and dialogue, the office sponsors a variety of educational/cultural programs during the academic year. These programs involve faculty, students, and staff. The office advises Brothers and Sisters United, Naciones Hispanas Unidas, Caribbean American Student Association, the University of Hartford Gospel Choir, Men of Color Alliance, WSAM Radio, and the UHa Steppez. For more information, call 860.768.5122.

Orientation. The Orientation program provides incoming full-time students with a thorough introduction to the University of Hartford. For details, see Orientation Programs .

Many student leadership opportunities exist within the Orientation program, and more information may be obtained by calling 860.768.4791.

Special Academic Opportunities

University Honors Program

The University of Hartford Honors Program is a special academic experience designed to create a stimulating and challenging intellectual environment for highly motivated students from all of the University’s schools and colleges. For students just admitted to the University, eligibility is determined on the basis of SAT or ACT scores and class rank; subsequently, students may participate in the program once they have fulfilled their college’s eligibility requirements for honors. Students may continue in the program as long as they maintain the GPA required by their college. To graduate with University Honors, students must have an overall average of at least 3.0 in their honors course work and must meet the GPA requirements established by their college. The designation of University Honors on the diploma is different from graduation honors based purely on grade point average, as the former signifies that students have completed a particular and distinctive academic honors program.

The University Honors Program requires 18 credits of honors course work, all of which must be taken for a letter grade. The honors curriculum has been designed both to encourage student interaction across the colleges in honors sections of required general education courses and to provide opportunities for enriched or accelerated work within the curricula of the individual colleges.

Each college has defined a particular honors experience for its students that may include special courses, interdisciplinary seminars, independent studies, and senior projects. Honors courses and seminars offered by the College of Arts and Sciences may be taken by students who qualify for the Honors Program, regardless of the college or school in which they are matriculated. The program is overseen by a University Honors director and a University Honors coordinating committee composed of honors coordinators from all the schools and colleges. Details about the specific honors requirements in each college may be found below.

Students matriculated in one college may complete all the requirements for honors in another college and thereby earn the University Honors designation. Students’ programs must be approved by the honors coordinators of both the college of matriculation and the one in which they are completing the honors requirements.

The Honors Experience

Honors Residential Learning Community. The Honors Residential Learning Community in Hawk Hall offers some students the chance to live in an environment in which they can develop social and intellectual relationships with other honors students. Students build a supportive community inside and outside the classroom and engage in community service projects.

Honors Week and the Undergraduate Colloquium: A Celebration of Research and Creativity. Sponsored by the Honors program and the Alpha Chi and Alpha Lambda Delta Honor Societies, these annual events celebrate the achievements of honors students. A range of activities culminate in a colloquium, at which outstanding students from across the University present their work before an audience of faculty members, peers, and family.

Honors students may also be eligible to belong to national honor societies, based on the societies’ own academic requirements. More information about national honors groups at the University may be found under Honorary Societies.

Contract Honors Courses

To provide those students who want to pursue the University Honors diploma with some flexibility, the University offers “contract honors” courses. To take a contract honors course, students enroll in a regular course and then arrange with the instructor to take it for honors credit. This is most commonly done within a student’s major, particularly in majors in which credit requirements are very high, to enable students to work toward the University Honors degree as they complete the requirements for their major. When students arrange to take a course as a contract honors course, the instructor identifies the special requirements that must be fulfilled. These may include additional reading, writing, and/or assignments; or assignments that are more involved and challenging than those given to the other students in the class.

Individual College Requirements

College of Arts and Sciences

Eligibility

First-semester freshmen are eligible to participate in the College of Arts and Sciences Honors program if they (1) were awarded a University of Hartford President’s or Regents’ Scholarship or (2) have a combined SAT score of at least 1140.

Transfer students who earned an overall GPA of 3.25 or higher at their previous institution are eligible to participate.

All other students who have an overall GPA of at least 3.0 are eligible to participate in the program.

Requirements

Students enrolled in the College of Arts and Sciences and those matriculated in other colleges who plan to pursue the University Honors degree through the College of Arts and Sciences must meet the requirements in one of the following two tracks:

Honors with Thesis
To earn the designation of University Honors with Thesis on the diploma, students must complete

  1. At least 18 credits of honors work taken for a letter grade, including
    • 6 or more credits of honors sections of general education (e.g., an honors section of RPW 110 , POL 110  , PHI 110 ) or honors sections of All-University Curriculum (AUC) courses or contract honors courses.
    • 6 or more credits of honors seminars (specially designed 300-level courses listed in the honors section of the Schedule of Classes). Two or three seminars are offered on varied topics each semester. Students in the natural sciences, with the permission of the A&S honors committee, may substitute a 300- or 400-level contract honors course for one of the seminars. In extraordinary circumstances only, and with the permission of the college’s honors committee, other students may make such a substitution. The Humanities Center seminars may also be used to fulfill the seminar requirement. Psychology honors students may, with permission, substitute PSY 487  for an honors seminar.
    • 6 credits of honors course work consisting of an honors thesis (HON 493 - Honors Research and HON 494 - Honors Thesis) or a University Scholar project approved by the A&S honors committee. Psychology honors students may substitute PSY 488  - Honors Thesis for HON 493. They must take HON 494.
  2. An overall grade point average of 3.25 and a 3.0 in honors work.

Transfer students who enter the University of Hartford with junior status or above need to complete 12 credits of honors work to earn the University honors degree, including two 3-credit honors seminars or one seminar and one 3-credit upper-level contract honors, and the 6-credit thesis or University Scholar project. Transfer students must meet the GPA requirements noted above.

Honors (Non-Thesis)
To earn the designation of University Honors on the diploma, students must complete

  1. At least 18 credits of honors work taken for a letter grade, including
    • 6 or more credits of honors sections of general education (e.g., an honors section of RPW 110 , POL 110  , PHI 110 ) or honors sections of All-University Curriculum (AUC) courses or contract honors courses.
    • 9 credits of honors seminars (specially designed 300-level courses listed in the honors section of the Schedule of Classes). Students may substitute one or two upper-level contract honors courses for one or two of the seminars. The Humanities Center may also be used to fulfill the seminar requirement.
    • A 3-credit Honors Research project, approved by the A&S honors committee and completed via honors contract during the senior year while enrolled in either (a) a 300-level honors seminar or (b) an upper-level course in the student’s major, including independent study or internship, as appropriate.
  2. An overall grade point average of 3.25 and a 3.0 in honors work.

Transfer students who enter the University of Hartford with junior status or above need to complete 12 credits of honors work to earn the University Honors degree, including 9 credits of honors seminars and upper-level contract honors, and the 3-credit Honors Research project. Transfer students must meet the GPA requirements noted above.

Barney School of Business

Eligibility

First-semester freshmen are eligible to participate in the Barney School of Business Honors program if they (1) were awarded a University of Hartford President’s or Regents’ Scholarship or (2) were designated as eligible to participate upon admission to the University.

Transfer students should consult with the Barney School honors coordinator to determine their eligibility.

All other students who have a GPA of at least 3.25 overall and in their major are eligible to participate in the program.

Requirements

For students enrolled in the Barney School, the following requirements must be met to complete the University Honors program and earn the designation of University Honors on the diploma:

  1. At least 18 credits of honors work taken for a letter grade, including
    • 9 credits of honors sections of general education (e.g., an honors section of RPW 110 , POL 110  , PHI 110 ) and/or honors sections of All-University Curriculum (AUC) courses and/or any other approved non-business honors courses
    • 6 credits of contract honors courses at the 300 level (or above) that are part of the student’s major or program of study, or, whenever appropriate, in honors courses or seminars (specially designed 300-level courses listed in the honors section of the Schedule of Classes; two or three seminars are offered on varied topics each semester).
    • 3 credits in senior-level honors: the research and writing of an honors thesis; or an independent study/mentorship; or a University Scholar independent project approved by the University Scholar Committee. Such a project may be more than 3 credits; only 3 credits are required for the Honors degree.
  2. An overall grade point average of 3.25, a 3.25 in the major, and a 3.0 in honors work
College of Education, Nursing and Health Professions

Eligibility

First-semester freshmen are eligible to participate in the ENHP Honors program if they (1) were awarded a University of Hartford President’s or Regents’ Scholarship or (2) were designated as eligible to participate upon admission to the University.

Transfer students should consult with the ENHP honors coordinator to determine their eligibility.

All other students who have a GPA of at least 3.0 overall and at least 3.25 in their major are eligible to participate in the program.

Requirements

For a student enrolled in ENHP, the requirements below must be met to complete the University Honors program and earn the designation of University Honors on the diploma:

  1. At least 18 credits of honors work taken for a letter grade, including
    • 6 credits of honors sections of general education (e.g., an honors section of RPW 110 , POL 110  , PHI 110 ) and/or honors sections of All-University Curriculum (AUC) courses
    • 6 credits of courses in the major for honors credit. This requirement may be fulfilled by taking contract honors courses with an Education, Nursing and Health Professions professor; or for Education Division students, by taking contract honors courses in the student’s chosen subject-area major.
    • 6-credit honors thesis, 6-credit independent project supervised by an ENHP faculty member, or 6-credit University Scholar independent project approved by the University Scholar Committee
  2. An overall grade point average of 3.00, a 3.25 in the major, and a 3.0 in honors work
College of Engineering, Technology, and Architecture

Engineering Students
Eligibility

First-semester freshmen are eligible to participate in CETA’s Engineering Honors program if they (1) were awarded a University of Hartford President’s or Regents’ Scholarship or (2) were designated as eligible to participate upon admission to the University.

Transfer students should consult with the CETA honors coordinator to determine their eligibility.

All other students who have a GPA of at least 3.0 overall are eligible to participate in the program.

Requirements

Engineering students must meet the requirements below to complete the University Honors program and earn the designation of University Honors on the diploma:

  1. At least 18 credits of honors work taken for a letter grade:
    • ES 116  and ES 117  Freshman Honors Seminar (1 credit each)
    • 6 credits of honors sections of humanities/ social science courses and/or honors sections of All-University Curriculum (AUC) courses
    • 6 credits of contract honors in engineering courses
    • 3 credits of upper-level independent study and research projects (including the University Scholar program) and participation in the college’s Engineering Applications Center projects
    • 1 credit in an engineering course or independent study taken as contract honors
  2. An overall grade point average of 3.00 and a minimum GPA of 3.0 in honors work

Technology Students
Eligibility

First-semester freshmen are eligible to participate in CETA’s Technology Honors program if they (1) were awarded a University of Hartford President’s or Regents’ Scholarship or (2) were designated as eligible to participate upon admission to the University. They may continue in the program if they have maintained an overall GPA of at least 3.0 based on the completion of 15 credits in a CETA program.

Transfer students should consult with the CETA honors coordinator to determine their eligibility.

All other students who have a GPA of at least 3.0 overall and a 3.25 in their major are eligible to participate in the program.

Requirements

For a technology student enrolled in CETA, the requirements below must be met to complete the University Honors program and earn the designation of University Honors on the diploma:

  1. At least 18 credits of honors work taken for a letter grade, including
    • 6 credits of honors sections of All-University Curriculum courses
    • 6 credits of honors courses or contract honors courses at the 200 level or above that are part of the student’s major
    • 6 credits of senior-level independent study courses such as the senior project course and/or the University Scholar program
  2. An overall grade point average of at least 3.00, and at least a 3.25 in the major, and a minimum of 3.0 in honors work
Hartford Art School

Eligibility

First-semester freshmen are eligible to participate in the Hartford Art School Honors program if they (1) were awarded a University of Hartford President’s or Regents’ Scholarship or (2) were designated as eligible to participate upon admission to the University.

Transfer students and all other students should consult with the Hartford Art School honors coordinator to determine their eligibility.

Requirements

For a student enrolled in the Hartford Art School, the requirements below must be met to complete the University Honors program and earn the designation of University Honors on the diploma:

  1. At least 18 credits of honors work taken for a letter grade. The Hartford Art School honors coordinator helps each student develop a plan to earn the required 18 credits of honors work, including
    • Honors sections of general education (e.g., Honors RPW) and/or All-University Curriculum (AUC) courses
    • Contract honors courses
    • Upper-level independent study and research projects (including the University Scholar program)
  2. An overall grade point average of 3.50 and a 3.0 in honors work
The Hartt School

Eligibility

First-semester freshmen are eligible to participate in the Hartt School Honors program if they were designated as eligible to participate upon admission to the University.

Transfer students should consult with the Hartt School honors coordinator to determine their eligibility.

All other students who have a GPA of at least 3.50 overall are eligible to participate in the program.

Requirements

For a student enrolled in Hartt, the requirements below must be met to complete the University Honors program and earn the designation of University Honors on the diploma:

  1. At least 18 credits of honors work taken for a letter grade:
    • 6–9 credits of honors sections of general education (e.g., an honors section of RPW 110 , POL 110  , PHI 110 ) courses
    • 6–9 credits of honors courses in any of the fine or performing arts, including All-University Curriculum (AUC) courses, courses in the College of Arts and Sciences, Hartford Art School, or Hartt. No more than 6 credits may be taken at Hartt, and only in courses at the 200 level and above. This requirement may be fulfilled through regularly scheduled honors courses and seminars or through contract honors.
    • 0–3 credits of graduate-level courses at Hartt (with the approval of the instructor)
    • 3–6 credits of senior-level honors independent study, or a University Scholar independent project approved by the University Scholar Committee
  2. An overall grade point average of 3.50 and a 3.0 in honors work
Hillyer College

Eligibility

First-year students are eligible to participate in the Hillyer College Honors program at the end of their first semester if they have completed 15 credits with a GPA of 3.0 or better. Thereafter, full-time students may join the honors experience when they attain a GPA of 3.0. If you are uncertain about your eligibility, consult the Hillyer College honors coordinator.

Requirements

The University Honors degree was designed as a baccalaureate degree program; since Hillyer College offers an associate’s degree, students are unable to earn the University Honors diploma through Hillyer College. However, honors work completed by eligible students in Hillyer College may fulfill University honors degree requirements should students matriculate in one of the other schools/colleges of the University of Hartford upon completing the program in Hillyer.

To complete the Honors program at Hillyer College a student must take at least 9 credits of honors courses for a letter grade and maintain an overall GPA of 3.0 or higher and grades of B or better in all honors courses. To receive honors credit the student must earn a grade of 3.0 or higher in an honors course. In addition, at least 6 credits must be taken either from designated Hillyer honors courses or as Hillyer College contract honors courses. A student may use an honors course offered in any of the other colleges for the remaining 3 credits.

University Studies: Multimedia Web Design and Development

Eligibility

First-semester freshmen are eligible to participate in the University Studies Honors program if they were designated as eligible to participate upon admission to the University.

Transfer students should consult with the honors coordinator for the multimedia Web design and development major to determine their eligibility.

All other students who have a GPA of at least 3.25 overall are eligible to participate in the program.

Requirements

A student enrolled in the multimedia Web design and development major must meet the requirements outlined below in order to earn the designation of University Honors on the diploma:

  1. At least 18 credits of honors work taken for a letter grade

This requirement may be satisfied by enrollment in the following courses:

  • 6 credits of honors sections of general education (e.g., an honors section of RPW 110 , POL 110 , PHI 110 ) and/or honors sections of All-University Curriculum (AUC) courses and/or contract honors courses
  • 6 credits of honors seminars (specially designed 300-level courses listed in the honors section of the Schedule of Classes). Each semester, two or three seminars are offered on varied topics. With permission of the department honors committee, students may substitute a 300- or 400- level contract honors course for one of the seminars.
  • 6-credit honors thesis sequence (HON 493 Honors Research and HON 494 Honors Thesis) or a 6-credit University Scholar independent project approved by the department honors committee
  1. An overall grade point average of 3.25 and a 3.0 GPA in honors work

College Honors Coordinators 2011–12

Barney School of Business
Professor Malek Lashgari
860.768.4655
lashgari@hartford.edu

College of Arts and Sciences
Associate Professor Donald Jones
860.768.4751
djones@hartford.edu

College of Education , Nursing and Health Professions
Assistant Professor Peter Oliver
860.768.5005
oliver@hartford.edu

College of Engineering, Technology, and Architecture
Professor Robert Celmer
860.768.4792
celmer@hartford.edu

Hartford Art School
Associate Dean G. Thomas Bradley
860.768.4396
tbradley@hartford.edu

The Hartt School

Associate Professor Irene Conley
(Music, Dance, and Theatre)
860.768.4957
conley@hartford.edu

Hillyer College
Assistant Professor Michelle Troy
860.768.4734
mtroy@hartford.edu

University Studies Multimedia Web Design and Development
Professor William Sanders
860.768.4502
wsanders@hartford.edu

Other Academic Opportunities

University Scholar Program. Selected students may be permitted to work on a tutorial basis with a senior professor. Application for admission to this program should be made through the office of the dean of the school in which the student is enrolled. All basic requirements of the school must normally be met by the time the student enters the University Scholar program, and students need not take regularly scheduled courses while they are University Scholars. Requirements in a major field may be modified to allow for intensive study of selected topics. Applications for this individual study program may be made after one resident year at the University. Approval must be secured each semester for continuation in this program.

R. C. Knox Center for Insurance Studies. As part of the Barney School’s graduate and undergraduate degree programs, the Center for Insurance Studies provides information and advice to all students interested in careers in the field of insurance. Special programs are also sponsored by the R. C. Knox Center on important issues currently facing the field.

The Theodore D. Veru Program in Business Excellence is an endowed program established in 1994 by Peter Veru to honor his father, an alumnus of the University and a member of the board of regents. This program hosts an annual spring dinner for deans, faculty, and approximately 70 invited undergraduate students, at which alumni and nonalumni business professionals present their observations, insights, and experiences as they relate to career opportunities and patterns.

ROTC. The University of Hartford, through a cross-enrollment arrangement with the University of Connecticut, offers full-time students the opportunity to participate in Army or Air Force ROTC. Army military courses are taken at the Hartford branch of the University of Connecticut, while Air Force courses are offered only on the Storrs campus.

Entering scholarships, applied for while in high school, are possible for AFROTC and for AROTC. Army ROTC four-year scholarships may now be used at an extension or cross-enrolled school. During the freshman and sophomore years, a non-scholarship student may participate in ROTC without military obligation after graduation, and there is no stipend paid to the student.

Admission to the upper level is limited and competitive based on college grade point average and performance in military courses. Enrollment at the upper level does involve a stipend and obligation for service.

Registration and program information may be obtained in the Office of Admission and Student Financial Assistance or the Registrar’s Office.

Women’s Education and Leadership Fund.  The Women’s Education and Leadership Fund (WELFund) is a community of women and men who believe that advancing the potential of women is a personal and professional priority.  Rooted in the historic legacy of Hartford College for Women, WELFund benefits women in all their diversity through grants, scholarships, leadership development programs, and inspiring conversations and events that build community.  WELFund was established in 2006 to foster and support University initiatives that enhance the educations of women, empower women to lead, and enrich the University community and beyond.  To learn more about WELFund and its grant and scholarship opportunities, visit www.hartford.edu/welfund.

Dorothy Goodwin Summer Scholars Program.  Educator, politician, world traveler, University of Hartford regent, and Hartford College for Women (HCW) trustee, Dorothy Goodwin inspired women and girls to live beyond limitations, to exercise their full potential.  She recognized that reaching one’s potential requires challenging opportunities, committed mentors and financial support.  In her honor, the Women’s Education and Leadership Fund (WELFund) at the University of Hartford annually awards Dorothy Goodwin scholarships to a select group of female students.  Sophomore and junior women are invited to propose innovative scholarly research or creative summer projects in partnership with University faculty.  Goodwin Scholars receive generous stipends, mentoring, leadership development, and professional etiquette education.  Faculty mentors receive a stipend toward professional development.  For additional information, visit www.hartford.edu/welfund.

Washington Semester Program. The University of Hartford is affiliated with the Washington Semester program, which allows qualified students to study for a semester in Washington, D.C. Students earn a full semester of credit by pursuing a specialized course of study in one of the following areas: American national government and politics, U.S. foreign policy, economic policy, justice, journalism, art and architecture, or business studies. The curriculum in each program includes extensive seminars with practitioners and public officials, internships, and research or elective study. For application information, contact the International Center, Gengras 328.

Study Abroad Programs. The University encourages students to participate in overseas student exchanges and study abroad programs. Students may choose to study in University approved summer, semester, and academic-year programs in a number of countries, including Argentina, Australia, Austria, Belgium, Chile, China, Czech Republic, France, Germany, Great Britain, Greece, Hungary, India, Ireland, Israel, Italy, Japan, the Netherlands, the Philippines, Poland, Russia, Scotland, South Africa, Spain, Switzerland, and Turkey. There are also short-term courses offered by University faculty during summer and winter terms. In addition, international internships are available through several of the University’s approved study abroad providers. Information on study abroad or international internships may be obtained at the International Center, Gengras 328, 860.768.5100.

Students may choose to study abroad in non-approved programs or to make independent arrangements to study abroad in approved programs. In this case, students make academic and financial arrangements directly with the study abroad program provider. Before going abroad, students should seek a leave of absence and go on active status for the period that they will be abroad. Students are responsible for ascertaining that the courses they take under such circumstances will transfer to the University and/or fulfill their degree requirements. Leaves of absence may also be granted for other reasons.

Students who participate as University students in semester-/yearlong approved programs continue to pay University of Hartford tuition and are considered continuing students. This enables students to apply all of their federal and state financial aid and most University grants or scholarships toward their study abroad. Students planning to study abroad are expected to obtain the appropriate University approvals for courses taken abroad and register with the International Center prior to departure. For further information on study abroad, student exchanges, and scholarship opportunities, contact the International Center in Gengras 328 at 860.768.5100 or www.hartford.edu/studyabroad.

John G. Martin Scholarship Program. The program, modeled after the Rhodes and Marshall Scholarships, gives a University of Hartford graduating senior the opportunity to study on scholarship for one or two years at Oxford University. Each year, Hertford College of Oxford University reserves one place in its incoming class for our graduate. The student is given “senior status,” thereby typically making it possible for him or her to complete a “final honours” school program and earn an Oxford B.A. in two years. Students earning an Oxford B.A. are entitled to receive an M.A. without further examination approximately seven years after matriculation. Alternatively, students are increasingly opting to matriculate directly into a graduate degree program at Oxford. The scholarships are based in part on need.

The University of Hartford will select graduating seniors as candidates for the program. The University’s selection committee will forward nomination materials for these students to the faculty of Hertford College, who will select the annual scholarship recipient. The deadline for students to apply for the program is November 1. For more information, contact the John G. Martin Scholarship Program, Dean of Undergraduate Studies, University of Hartford, West Hartford, CT 06117; 860.768.4696.

Stephen Joel Trachtenberg Scholarships/Hebrew University of Jerusalem. A Trachtenberg scholarship fund, established in cooperation with the Hebrew University of Jerusalem, normally provides on an annual basis one or more scholarships to exceptional University of Hartford undergraduate students. The recipients of these scholarships will spend eleven months in Israel while attending classes for overseas students at the Rothberg School of the Hebrew University located on Mount Scopus, the main campus of the Hebrew University of Jerusalem. Intensive Hebrew language training is provided during the first weeks of the academic year, but classes are taught in English at the Rothberg School. These scholarships are highly competitive, but University of Hartford students are given preference. Applications and additional information about the program can be obtained at the Maurice Greenberg Center for Judaic Studies.

Maurice Greenberg Center for Judaic Studies and Chair in Judaic Studies. The Center for Judaic Studies is an integral academic program within the College of Arts and Sciences. Founded with a major endowment, the center promotes the scholarly and objective study of Judaism. The center’s director holds the Greenberg Professorship in Judaic Studies and a dual appointment in the Department of History.

Concentrations. The center administers the major and minor in Judaic studies, which includes courses in the history, culture, language, and law of Judaism. These concentrations are multi-disciplinary and provide each concentrator with a firm historical foundation and an opportunity to specialize in a particular area of Judaic studies.

Courses. The center oversees all Judaic studies courses, including language courses offered at the University through the Hebrew College, Hartford branch. The center has a Trachtenberg Scholarship to the Hebrew University of Jerusalem and similar exchange programs at other Israeli universities.

Public Offerings. The Greenberg Center sponsors numerous public lectures and periodic symposia on the full range of Judaic Studies. These presentations highlight internationally known scholars and are open to the University community and the public.

Archaeological Excavation. During Winterterm and Summerterm, the University of Hartford sponsors excavations in Israel, which yield 6 credits. Space is limited. For more information, call R. J. McGivney, Winterterm/Summerterm, at 860.768.4401.

Fuller descriptions of courses and concentrations are available under the Judaic Studies listing in this Bulletin. For further information regarding these subjects, foreign study in Judaic studies, or to obtain a calendar of the Maurice Greenberg Center’s events, call the center’s office at 860.768.4964.

Intercollege Cooperative Programs

Hartford Consortium for Higher Education. The University is a founding member of the Hartford Consortium for Higher Education. Founded in 1972, the consortium has been a vehicle for the development of joint programs that serve students, faculty, and the wider community. Members include Capital Community College; Central Connecticut State University; Charter Oak State College; Goodwin College; Manchester Community College;  Rensselaer at Hartford; the University of Saint Joseph; Trinity College; and the University of Connecticut, Greater Hartford campus. Hartford Seminary and St. Thomas Seminary are associate members, and Connecticut Public Broadcasting Network is an affiliate of the Consortium.

The consortium promotes cross-registration for selected courses among its member institutions as a service to undergraduate students. Cross-registration is open to all full- and part-time students registered as undergraduate or graduate students at member institutions. Undergraduate students are permitted to elect a wide range of approved courses at private member institutions, while a more limited list of courses for cross-registration is also available at Capital Community College; Central Connecticut State University; Charter Oak State College; and the University of Connecticut, Hartford campus. Courses on other campuses that have been of special interest to University of Hartford students are in the fields of the classics, modern languages and linguistics, religion, philosophy, special education, science, and African American studies.

Enrollment in consortium courses is on a space-available basis. Students pay tuition to their home institution, and fees are charged only for additional course materials and practices, such as lab fees and books. Registration forms and information may be obtained through the Registrar’s Office or through the Hartford Consortium office at www.hartfordconsortium.org.

Library facilities at consortium colleges are available jointly to registered students at all consortium institutions. Those not enrolled in the intercollegiate cross-registration program should consult the University of Hartford access services librarian for interlibrary referral forms.

Many of the community service, cultural, and social events sponsored by the consortium are open to University of Hartford students as well as students at other consortium colleges and universities.

Hebrew College. By special arrangement with the Hebrew College of Brookline, Mass., University of Hartford students are eligible to take courses at the regional branch, located in the Jewish Federation building, 333 Bloomfield Ave., West Hartford. Arrangements for handling course registration and credits are similar for courses selected under the Greater Hartford Consortium program.

Connecticut Space Grant College Consortium. The University’s commitment to engineering and technology excellence is apparent as visitors enter the campus and note the office of the Connecticut Space Grant College Consortium. The Space Grant leadership is located in the College of Engineering, Technology, and Architecture. The partnership between the University of Hartford (lead institution); Central, Eastern, and Southern Connecticut State universities; Fairfield University; Trinity College; Wesleyan University; the universities of Bridgeport, Connecticut, and New Haven; and the Connecticut College of Technology seeks to further NASA’s goals of increasing understanding, evaluation, development, and utilization of space resources.

Fellowships and grants are available to undergraduate and graduate students and faculty. Research enhancement activities include faculty forums, participation in design competitions, and access to NASA mentors at research and flight centers around the country. Public outreach programs target the involvement of traditionally underrepresented groups in science, engineering, and technology careers.

van Rooy Center for Complexity and Conflict Analysis. The University is home to the van Rooy Center for Complexity and Conflict Analysis. Established in 2008 though a generous gift from University of Hartford regent Jean-Pierre van Rooy and his wife, Marie-Claire, the center supports a wide range of activities related to the fields of complexity and conflict analysis. These include curricular initiatives and research, both on the graduate and undergraduate levels, and organizing conferences and seminars on complexity and conflict analysis. The center provides support for students and faculty from a wide range of disciplines across the University as they investigate problems and issues through the lens of complexity theory.

For further information about the van Rooy Center for Complexity and Conflict Analysis, call 860.768.5556 or e-mail horvath@hartford.edu.

Academic Support Services

English Language Institute. The University offers an intensive English as a Foreign Language program for persons whose primary language is not English. The program seeks to improve the student’s overall educational experience by working toward a greater proficiency in understanding, reading, writing, and speaking English. The program is offered year-round.

Center for Reading and Writing. The Center for Reading and Writing offers one-on-one assistance with academic strategies to students in all departments and colleges. Professional and peer tutors provide instruction in writing essays and research papers, task management, reading and remembering textbook information, organizing and reviewing classroom notes, and preparing for exams.

Learning Plus. Learning Plus offers academic support services to University of Hartford students who submit required documentation that clearly supports the diagnoses of a specific learning disability and/or attention deficit disorder. The documentation must prove that the student has a current disability that substantially impairs learning. Determination of services is made on a case-by-case basis, depending on semester standing, grade point average, and course curricula. Please note: Learning Plus does not provide comprehensive services.

In order to access services and accommodations, the student must follow these steps:

  1. Self-disclose by submitting current documentation directly to Learning Plus once the student has been accepted to the University of Hartford and has paid a deposit. Documentation requirements are detailed on the Learning Plus website, http://uhaweb.hartford.edu/LDsupport. IEP and 504 plans, in and of themselves, do not constitute acceptable documentation.
  2. Make an appointment with the director of Learning Plus to draft a letter of disclosure within the first two weeks of the semester. In addition, the student must make appointments with individual professors to self-disclose and to submit letters of disclosure.

Learning Plus services include the following:

  • Letters of Disclosure. Documents verifying that the student has a disability and is eligible for specific accommodations. Letters of disclosure must be submitted to professors at the beginning of each semester in order for the student to receive accommodations.
  • Direct Strategies. First-year and transfer students meet with a learning specialist for a weekly, 45-minute, one-on-one appointment throughout the semester. Specialists provide direct instruction in various learning strategies.
  • Check-in. Sophomore students may elect to meet with a learning specialist every other week to reinforce learning strategies and to monitor academic progress.
  • Drop-in. Students may access Learning Plus on an as-needed basis. A limited number of drop-in appointments are available each week.
  • Test Accommodations. Students who are eligible may take tests at Learning Plus. Test accommodations are determined by the documentation that the student has submitted. Possible test accommodations include extended time, a test environment with minimal distractions, or use of a calculator when appropriate.
  • Students who have physical, psychiatric, or medical disabilities should submit documentation to the Assistant Vice President for Student Health/Wellness, Student Affairs, Gengras Student Union, Room 307, to arrange for reasonable/appropriate accommodations.

Student Services

Student Administrative Services Center. The Student Administrative Services Center (SASC) provides a “one-stop shopping” service for student-related administrative processes including registration, bill payment, enrollment verification, access to academic records, and basic financial aid information.

SASC features the following conveniences:

  • an express transaction window for simple registration and payment activity, including rush transcript requests
  • consultation with a specialist to assist with more complex issues, and
  • student access to online services at computer kiosks.

SASC provides enhanced service to students through its case-management approach. Students work with a well-trained, client-service specialist who is responsible for navigating the various stages of enrollment and financial services. If there are unresolved issues, the SASC specialist is responsible for following up until they are resolved.

The unit is located on the second floor of the Administration and Computer Center building.

Hours Monday–Thursday, 8:30 a.m.–6 p.m.
  Friday, 8:30 a.m.–3 p.m.
  During peak registration periods,
  hours may be extended.
Phone: 860.768.4999
E-mail: SASC@hartford.edu
Web: http://hartford.edu/sasc


Bursar.
For information regarding tuition, fees, loan disbursements, and financial arrangements, students should contact the Bursar’s Office, room 218, Computer and Administration Center. Normal business hours are from 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m., Monday through Friday. Detailed information is available at www.hartford.edu/bursar. For billing and payment inquiries, please contact the Student Administrative Services Center.

Registrar. All official academic records and grades are held in the Registrar’s Office, located on the second floor of the Computer and Administration Center. The office is open from 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m., Monday through Friday.

Center for Graduate and Adult Academic Services—Credit Courses. The University offers nearly 40 graduate degree programs.  Pursuing a postbaccalaureate degree can provide a gateway to a profession, the chance to move to a new professional level, or simply increase knowledge and skills.    The University also offers degree completion programs for qualified individuals an opportunity to enroll in day or evening courses as part-time students at the undergraduate level. Enrollment is open to graduates of approved secondary schools, to holders of Connecticut equivalency certificates, and to persons who give other evidence of ability and previous educational preparation adequate for the successful completion of studies for which application is made.

Part-time undergraduate students may register for certain courses without being enrolled in a degree program, but upon completion of 15 credits of work through the Center for Graduate and Adult Academic Services, a student must apply for matriculation (acceptance as a candidate for a degree) or for permission to continue as a nonmatriculated student.

International Center. The International Center, located in Gengras Student Union, coordinates and facilitates activities promoting international education, international awareness, and a culturally diverse learning environment. It is responsible for study abroad programs, international student orientation, faculty/staff exchanges, student exchanges, and workshops, seminars, and conferences related to international education. The International Center advises students on study abroad and provides nonacademic advising to international students. It also coordinates internationally related activities with various local, national, and international institutions, organizations, and agencies, as well as assists in the identification of external resources for the promotion of international education and language competency at the University.

Veterans’ Affairs. Veterans who enroll at the University of Hartford are encouraged to take advantage of the counseling and services of the Office of Veterans’ Affairs. Information concerning benefit claims and help in completing VA forms are provided to veterans and eligible persons through the Veteran Certification Officer, located in the Registrar’s Office in Beatrice Fox Auerbach Computer and Administration Center.

Adult Guest Audit Program. The Adult Guest Audit program provides opportunities for retired people, 65 years of age or older, to become acquainted with the University’s academic offerings.

Qualified adults who participate in this program may audit one credit course per semester, up to a maximum of 24 credits, by paying only the applicable fees. Departmental authorization may be required for certain courses; noncredit, laboratory, and performance courses are not available for audit. Registration is on a space-available basis.

President’s College. This innovative program is designed for intellectually curious adults, mature men and women who want to experience again the kind of educational adventure best pursued in a University setting. These specially designed classes are open to any adult with an interest in the humanities. There is no age requirement, just the desire to learn. President’s College courses are serious and challenging yet entirely enjoyable for anyone who finds learning one of life’s great pleasures.

High School Advance Enrollment Program—“College NOW.” As a service to local communities, the University makes available many of its regular courses to especially well-qualified high school students who have satisfied the academic prerequisites and exhausted all course offerings available at their high schools. Students must be recommended in writing by their high school counselor and formally accepted by the Center for Graduate and Adult Academic Services. Students accepted into the program may enroll in one course per fall and spring semesters, on a space-available basis, tuition free. Students are responsible for applicable fees and books. Registration takes place through the Center for Graduate and Adult Academic Services.

LINCS—Learning in Noncredit Settings. Through the University of Hartford LINCS program, undergraduate college credit can be earned for learning in a variety of noncollege or noncredit settings. These learning experiences may include on-the-job training, self-study programs, independent reading, etc. Credit may be awarded for learning in most disciplines in any college or school of the University.

The University of Hartford grants undergraduate credit only for college-level learning equivalents, not simply for life experience. Many experiences, although important, will not qualify for college-level credit. Thus, the first step for a credit applicant is to clarify which life experiences may have been true learning experiences, equivalent to learning through college study. In order to determine an appropriate credit award, the student applicant goes through a process of evaluation or verification. This process includes assembling a portfolio describing and documenting relevant learning experiences. For more information, contact the Center for Graduate and Adult Academic Services at 860.768.4373.

Alumni Association of the University of Hartford. The Alumni Association welcomes the participation of all University of Hartford graduates. More than 75,000 members span the globe, reflecting the broad geographical diversity of the University community. The association helps alumni to stay in touch with one another and with the life of the University.

Alumni can participate in a variety of events and activities sponsored by the association, both on and off campus and through regional chapters. A calendar of events is published in the Alumni Association’s e-newsletter, and on the alumni website. The University’s magazine, Observer, covers news about the alumni and publishes class notes as well as marriage and birth/adoption announcements.

There are many volunteer opportunities available to alumni, such as serving on the alumni board, supporting regional alumni activities, and providing career development assistance. Alumni volunteers also play a key role in encouraging peers to support the University’s educational mission through financial contributions.

For additional information on activities sponsored by the Alumni Association, please contact the Alumni Office locally at 860.768.2434 or toll free at 1.888.UH.ALUMS. You may also e-mail alumni@hartford.edu or view the alumni section at www.hartford.edu.

Center for Professional Development.  The Center for Professional Development (CPD) has helped Connecticut residents achieve career success for more than 40 years.  It offers services that allow individuals to identify and explore fulfilling careers that prepare entrepreneurs to build successful businesses.  CPD’s career development, training, education, and consulting services help organizations, businesses, and corporations to prepare strong leaders and create productive work environments.

The Center’s Entrepreneurial Center offers comprehensive training on self-employment for women and men.  For further information about all of the center’s programs, call 860.768.5619.

Other Student Services and Programs

Undergraduate Commuter Association. The Undergraduate Commuter Association (UCA) represents the interests of all commuting and transfer students at the University of Hartford with regard to housing, transportation, public safety, parking, and information on the Greater Hartford community. The UCA ensures that these students have a voice in campus decision making and representation in key student organizations. The UCA helps students with transition into the University through involvement in campus activities and social programming. All students are welcome to stop by the UCA lounge in Gengras Student Union, room 146.

Red Key Society. Members of this student organization volunteer their knowledge of the University in providing a variety of services to prospective students. Under the auspices of the Office of Admission and Student Financial Assistance, Red Key members serve as campus tour guides and hosts to overnight student guests. Their involvement extends to special functions, such as Open House, bus tours, receptions, and the phoning of prospective students.

Campus Ministry. Protestant, Roman Catholic, and Jewish clergy, who currently form the Department of Chaplains (located in Gengras Student Union, room 153), are available for personal counseling and conversation with interested individuals, and to assist students in worship, study and discussion groups, service and action projects, events, and other religious activities. The clergy help students to serve in various capacities through churches, synagogues, and other religious institutions in Greater Hartford.

Hillel Foundation. Hillel’s mission is to bring Jewish students together in a welcoming, supportive environment. Hillel actively seeks to engage uninvolved Jewish students on their own terms, to provide them with opportunities to experience the Jewish culture in a way that is meaningful and appealing to them. Students are empowered to take responsibility for their Jewish identity, whether they wish to participate in a community service project or social event, express themselves artistically, engage in informal Jewish learning, or attend religious services. Any student may participate in Hillel; no membership is required. Hillel is committed to a pluralistic vision of Judaism that embraces all movements.

Newman Club. The Newman Club provides a foundation for Catholic students to live and grow in their faith through social, educational, spiritual, and community service activities. Programming is student-led and -planned. Meetings are open to all who have interest in Catholic life on campus. A Catholic priest serves as the advisor to the Newman Club. He also is available for spiritual direction and counseling. Mass is celebrated every Sunday and holy day on campus during the academic year.

Women for Change. Women for Change is a campus-based organization that promotes education, open dialogue, and support surrounding body image issues, feminism, and sexuality among people of all ages, backgrounds, ethnicities, and sexual orientation.  The group originated in 2008 as an outgrowth of a University Honors Seminar, “Women, Weight, and Worry.”

Campus Media

The Informer. A weekly student newspaper at the University of Hartford, The Informer is published Thursdays during the academic year. With its offices located on the lower level of Gengras Student Union, the newspaper offers students, regardless of major or class standing, the opportunity to gain valuable hands-on experience in the areas of writing, editing, layout, photography, and advertising. The newspaper’s major sections include campus news, features, and sports. The Informer’s phone number is 860.768.4723.

WWUH Radio, a noncommercial FM station broadcasting at 91.3 FM, operates as a community service of the University of Hartford. Managed by students and community volunteers, its objective is to enable the University to extend its educational and cultural communications to the Greater Hartford area. The station offers students valuable hands-on experience in the fields of broadcasting, music/arts management, engineering and promotions. WWUH operates year-round from studios and offices located in the lower level of the east wing of the Harry Jack Gray Center. WWUH presents programming not readily available in the area, including the finest in jazz, folk, urban, alternative rock, classical and ethnic music programs, in addition to award-winning public affairs and news programming. Students are invited to call 860.768.4703 or to stop by the studios to get more information on how to join the staff. WWUH maintains a listener line, 860.768.5913, where students can request a copy of the current Program Guide. Our website (http://wwuh.org) includes Realaudio, allowing WWUH programming to be heard throughout the world.

WSAM Radio is operated entirely by University of Hartford students. WSAM’s signal is broadcast at 610 on the AM band, 106.3 on the FM band, and on the University’s cable system channel 4. WSAM’s signal is also piped into the residential dining hall in University Commons. Besides providing practical on-air experience, WSAM offers hands-on experience in the operation and management of a radio station. WSAM provides alternative music, news, sports (including live coverage of Hartford Hawks basketball, baseball, lacrosse, and soccer), and campus affairs programming. Located in the lower level of University Commons, WSAM’s phone number is 860.768.4238.

Channel 2 News, with offices in GSU 151 and studios in the Harry Jack Gray Center, produces one of the few live, student-run television newscasts in the country. The newscast is aired live each Friday afternoon at 4 p.m. on the University’s cable system and rebroadcast several times the following week. Produced totally by students, Channel 2 News covers campus events, the weather, and Hartford Hawks sports. Working on the weekly telecast provides students with an opportunity to learn about all aspects of television news production, including reporting, writing, video photography, editing, and directing. Channel 2 News may be reached by calling 860.768.5213.

Research Centers

Engineering Applications Center. The College of Engineering, Technology, and Architecture at the University of Hartford believes that industry is an important partner in the University’s ability to sustain excellence in engineering through education and applied research. The Engineering Applications Center is a vehicle for collaboration between industry and the University. The center provides the opportunity for local business and industry to apply new technologies to their products and processes through application projects, demonstrations, consulting, short courses, symposia, and forums in a wide range of current interest areas. The center not only provides a resource to industry for technology transfers, but it also contributes to the quality of engineering education at the college by involving students in various real-world projects.

The Engineering Applications Center is managed by the College of Engineering, Technology, and Architecture with support from the Barney School of Business and the College of Arts and Sciences. It comprises the following: the Manufacturing Engineering Institute, the Energy and Environmental Institute, the Acoustics and Vibrations Institute, the Biomechanics Research Institute, and the Institute of Signal Processing.

For further information about the Engineering Applications Center’s services and the continuing engineering education activities, call 860.768.4629 or e-mail filburn@hartford.edu.

Center for Research and Documentation on World Language Problems. The University is home to the Center for Research and Documentation on World Language Problems, an international body for the advancement of study, documentation, and education on all aspects of language problems in international relations.

Center for Social Research. The Center for Social Research is a unit within the Department of Sociology in the College of Arts and Sciences that engages in applied research for state and local organizations. Faculty from the Sociology department and across the University conduct studies and provide internship opportunities for students pursuing the Certificate in Applied Social Research. Internship students work closely with faculty in all phases of the research process, including the design, collection, and analysis of data, as well as the presentation of research results. Recent projects include an evaluation of a statewide child abuse prevention program, an environmental equity study, and a life stories study of vulnerable, first-time parents in Connecticut.

Center for Integrated Design. Architecture, Engineering, Business, and Visual Communication Design Solutions for the Community. The Center for Integrated Design (CID) provides Hartford and the surrounding communities with resources and solutions that address architectural, engineering, business, and visual communication design issues. It is committed to establishing interdisciplinary and educational dialogues between the community, the University’s faculty, and its students. CID works on projects that intersect four disciplines: architecture, engineering, business, and visual communication design. Students and faculty work collaboratively with clients, providing direct interaction and experience for students. A project may include all four disciplines, any combination of disciplines, or only one of them. Governments, public entities, private entities, public K–12 schools, private K–12 schools, nonprofits, and other organizations submit projects for consideration. The projects have clearly defined goals and are typically completed during the academic year, allowing continuity of student involvement and experiential learning.

Engineers Without Borders
The student chapter of Engineers Without Borders of the University of Hartford is assisting communities in India and Kenya to develop a sustainable supply of clean water to improve their health and living conditions. Operating from a holistic approach, students from throughout the University are working together on these complex social, economic, religious, and political issues. For example, students in the College of Engineering, Technology, and Architecture are implementing sustainable and appropriate technical solutions, such as a solar-powered groundwater pump and rainwater harvesting systems; Hartford Art School students are developing visual campaigns to promote education and wellness; students in the College of Education, Nursing and Health Professions are performing health assessments; and students in the College of Arts and Sciences are performing community needs assessments and measuring the changes brought about by the student projects. Students travel to India and Kenya to work on the projects during winter, spring, and summer breaks.

Construction Institute. The University of Hartford Construction Institute is a nonprofit, nonpartisan professional association of building and construction industry decision makers working to improve the industry by sharing experience and knowledge and developing business leaders. Institute members include all the professions, disciplines, and related industries that serve and supply the entire construction industry.

Through its affiliation with the University of Hartford, the institute provides the construction industry with educational and professional training services to help practitioners improve their management skills, add to their technical knowledge, and improve productivity.

At the core of the institute is its role of serving as a catalyst and neutral forum for bringing together industry professionals to examine current issues and seek solutions to major industry problems.

Further information may be found on the institute’s website at www.construction.org, by e-mail at wcianci@construction.org, or by calling 860.768.4459.

Campus Facilities

The 350-acre main campus of the University is located at 200 Bloomfield Ave. in an attractive residential section, partly in Hartford, West Hartford, and Bloomfield, overlooking the central city four miles away. It is easily accessible to the major highways and to air, rail, and bus transportation.

Bates House, a large, white frame building, the original structure on the campus, contains the Office of Admission and Student Financial Assistance.

Beatrice Fox Auerbach Computer and Administration Center. The University of Hartford’s commitment to the education of students in the multitude of areas related to computing is demonstrated by the construction in 1983 of the Beatrice Fox Auerbach Computer and Administration Center.

The center houses Information Technology Services (ITS), which supports both academic and administrative computing functions. It includes the Computer Support Center, where students and faculty can get basic computer support, obtain information and documentation on services and software available, as well as have access to scanners and printers for personal or academic use. The Computer Learning Center offers daytime hours for faculty and staff business and development, with evening hours as open lab time for all students.

ITS maintains hundreds of computers and dozens of network servers. It provides e-mail, Blackboard™, and Web-page accounts; Web-based access to mail, grades, and registration information; and streaming audio and video services. The University’s administrative computing systems are also housed and maintained by ITS. ITS’s computer lab PCs provide Web browsers; e-mail access; Web-page creation software; access to specialized software, such as SPSS, and Discrete Math; and the Microsoft Office Professional software suite. The general-access computer labs are located in Auerbach Hall (room AH113); Dana Hall (room D412); Mortensen Library, with PCs on all floors; and the Computer Learning Center (room CC114). All of the University’s residences are connected to the Internet via both wired and wireless access. The entire academic side of campus, along with the Asylum Avenue campus, currently offers wireless access.

On the center’s second floor are the offices of the Registrar, the Bursar, Veterans’ Affairs, National Direct Student Loan, Director of Planning and Institutional Research, Office of Summer and Winter Programs, and the Center for Graduate and Adult Academic Services.

The third floor provides space for the executive officers of the University, including the president and the provost. The University secretary and general counsel, the All-University Curriculum, and the head of the Faculty Senate also have offices on the third floor.

Beatrice Fox Auerbach Hall. This building houses the Barney School of Business; the College of Education, Nursing and Health Professions’ departments of Nursing and Educational Leadership; the departments of English and Rhetoric and Professional Writing; and the English Language Institute.

East Hall. In addition to classrooms, this building houses the College of Arts and Sciences’ Department of Psychology and the Graduate Institute of Professional Psychology.

Alfred C. Fuller Music Center. Consisting of Paranov Hall, Millard Auditorium, and O’Connell Hall, the Alfred C. Fuller Music Center, which houses The Hartt School, contains facilities for the study of music.

Hillyer Hall. Offices of the College of Arts and Sciences (humanities and social sciences), the College of Education, Nursing and Health Professions’ dean’s office and Department of Education and Human Services, and Hillyer College are in Hillyer Hall, which also houses classrooms, the Gilman Family Center for Communication Technology, the Educational Technology Laboratory, the English language laboratory, Auerbach Auditorium, and the Esphyr Slobodkina Urquhart Children’s Reading Room.  The Shaw Center at Hillyer College, a two-story, 10,000-square-foot addition to Hillyer Hall, opened in the fall of 2012, providing Hillyer College with much-needed faculty offices, state-of-the-art classrooms, a dedicated seminar classroom, a conference room, and a large common area.

The Integrated Science, Engineering, and Technology (ISET) complex interconnects the Charles A. Dana Hall, United Technologies Hall, and the Biology-Chemistry Building. The complex is designed to create a synergism among engineering, engineering technology, science, mathematics, computer programs, and health profession disciplines. For a listing of departments and programs in each of the buildings, please see the descriptions below.

Biology-Chemistry Building. Opened in 2005, this ISET building is approximately 40,000 square feet in total size and contains the College of Arts and Sciences’ Chemistry and Biology departments. The building has modern laboratories and research facilities for biology and chemistry, and also houses the Department of Engineering Laboratory and the College of Education, Nursing and Health Professions’ Clinical Laboratory Science Laboratory.

Charles A. Dana Hall houses the College of Arts and Sciences’ Department of Mathematics and its Physics and Computer Science programs; the College of Education, Nursing and Health Professions’ departments of Physical Therapy and Health Sciences; the College of Engineering, Technology, and Architecture’s engineering and technology laboratories and research facilities; University Studies’ Interactive Information Technology program; and classrooms.

United Technologies Hall. This ISET building contains the dean’s office of the College of Engineering, Technology, and Architecture; the engineering and technology faculty and laboratories; the college’s Engineering Application Center; and classrooms.

Visual Arts Complex. The Hartford Art School occupies several facilities for visual arts instruction centrally located on the University campus. All art school facilities offer barrier-free access for the handicapped.

Gengras Student Union (GSU) is the hub of the University of Hartford campus. It serves as a gathering place for students, faculty, staff, alumni, parents, and guests of the University, who take advantage of its many services. These services include the Office of Student Centers, Office of Student Activities, North and South Cafeteria dining areas, meeting rooms, and Suisman Lounge. GSU is the focal point for many of the social, cultural, and recreational activities of the University and is frequently used for events scheduled by the Greater Hartford community.

Gengras Student Union provides office space for many student organizations, including Brothers and Sisters United, Naciones Hispanas Unidas, University Commuter Association, Greek Life, Icon yearbook, The Informer newspaper, STN 2 News, the Muslim Student Association, Student Government Association, and Spectrum.

It also provides a number of services to assist student organizations in program planning and organizational effectiveness. Student organizations receive assistance from the Office of Student Centers to schedule meeting rooms or programs in GSU or other campus facilities, as well as information about community service, volunteering, leadership opportunities, and other services available on campus.

Also located in GSU are the offices of the Vice President for Student Affairs, ARAMARK campus dining service, Career Services, Student Employment and Cooperative Education, Campus Ministry, Counseling and Psychological Services, a Bank of America branch and an ATM, GSU and Konover Campus Center administration and facilities scheduling, the International Center, Mail Services, and Multicultural Programs.

The operating hours of Gengras Student Union during the academic year are

Monday–Friday 7:30 a.m.–11 p.m.
Saturday–Sunday 12 noon–11 p.m.


Konover Campus Center.
The Konover Campus Center, adjacent to a small pond, provides a large hall for lectures, movies, concerts, dances, and other events and also houses the Village Market, Taco Bell, and Market Deli. It is managed and reserved through the Gengras Student Union Office in GSU 205. Operating hours of the Konover Campus Center during the academic year are 

Monday–Friday 7:30 a.m.–11 p.m.
Saturday–Sunday 12 noon–11 p.m.


Lincoln Theater
provides Greater Hartford with a performing arts center of great flexibility. Adaptable staging and seating, with a capacity of 716 to 1,100, and advanced technical-production capabilities ensure the most effective showcasing. Hartt School performances, films, popular student acts, corporate events, and other community use of the theater make it a vital and highly visible part of the University of Hartford. Lincoln Theater also houses the University of Hartford Box Office, which handles ticket sales for the majority of events sponsored by the University.

Handel Performing Arts Center. The Mort and Irma Handel Performing Arts Center, which opened in 2008, was converted from an industrial building designed in 1929 by pioneering industrial architect Albert Kahn.  This vibrant center for performing arts education serves as a resource for the entire community.

The 56,000-square-foot, state-of-the-art facility provides performance and rehearsal spaces, classrooms, and studios for students in The Hartt School’s dance and theatre divisions, as well as Hartt Community Division’s dance program.  The center houses the 300-seat Edward C. and Ann T. Roberts Foundation Theater and the 100-seat Kent McCray Theater, venues for theatre and dance performances, recitals, lectures, and Community Division performances.

All dance classes for dance division students are held at the Handel Performing Arts Center.  The facility’s south wing includes five spacious studios, artistic and production offices, a conference room, and dressing and shower facilities.  Classes for theatre division majors are held in the north wing, which houses four rehearsal studios/classrooms.

Harry Jack Gray Center. Harry Jack Gray Center contains, in addition to the William H. Mortensen Library and the Mildred P. Allen Memorial Library, the Gray Conference Center, including Wilde Auditorium; the Joseloff Gallery; the University bookstore; studios for art, radio, and television; the School of Communication; the College of Engineering, Technology, and Architecture’s programs, faculty, and facilities in architecture; and the 1877 Club Restaurant, the University’s upscale, buffet-menu restaurant. The Gray Center is a great attraction for business and civic conferences, special student events, and provides a setting for multi-disciplinary learning.

The Sports Center is a comprehensive athletics complex that not only showcases the University’s intercollegiate programs but also provides recreational resources for the entire campus community. It encompasses 130,000 square feet of space and provides a home for intercollegiate, intramural, and club sports, fitness and health-related activities, and recreation and socializing for students, faculty, staff, and alumni.

Highlighting the Sports Center is a 3,508-seat main arena, the Chase Family Arena, home to the University’s basketball teams and other intercollegiate programs. The arena is also used for a variety of special events throughout the year.

The facility features an NCAA competition-size swimming pool; courts for volleyball, badminton, squash, and racquetball; and two fitness and weight rooms (a free-weight room and a 2,800-square-foot area with Eagle Cybex equipment). Six lighted tennis courts are located behind the Sports Center, adjacent to the soccer fields. The center offers such amenities as a pro shop, meeting rooms, concession areas, locker rooms with saunas, classrooms for sports and leisure classes, athletics staff offices, and a study hall for student-athletes.

The Yousuf Al-Marzook Field at Alumni Stadium, behind the Sports Center, is used for intercollegiate competition and practices, fitness and leisure classes, and intramurals. The area is equipped with lights that allow for night play. Fiondella Field and the University of Hartford softball field are also used for both intercollegiate and intramural competition.

The Mary Baker Stanley Pool, a 25-meter outdoor swimming facility for warm-weather use, is located directly behind the Sports Center.

Operations Building. Located in the northeast corner of the campus, the building houses the Public Safety, Purchasing, and Facilities departments.

Magnet Schools

The phrase, A Private University with a Public Purpose,” appropriately describes the University’s educational covenant with the city for which it is named. The two magnet schools located on campus are representative of the University’s commitment to support educational progress in the Hartford region, and diverse programs within the University offer opportunities to expand horizons for many young people in the Greater Hartford area.

The University of Hartford Magnet School is an interdistrict elementary school of up to 400 students, sponsored by the Capitol Region Education Council, in which students from preschool through grade 5 are selected by lottery from more than 20 participating schoool districts. Designed on Harvard Professor Howard Gardner’s theory of multiple intelligences—that is, that each student learns based on one of eight identifiable types of intelligence—the curriculum is supported by a teacher-to-student ratio of 14 to 1 and benefits from many resources on the University of Hartford campus.

The University of Hartford Magnet School also serves as a practicum opportunity for the teacher training, health professions, and nursing programs of the University; magnet school student groups are frequent visitors to departments across campus as well. An on-site, licensed wellness center provides confidential physical and mental-health services to the students. An Early Childhood Learning Center and an extended-day program complete the school’s offerings.

University High School of Science and Engineering is modeled on the Early College system, in which high expectations help students to bridge the high school–to–college experience. In this partnership between the University of Hartford and the Hartford school system, every class is offered on an honors level, readying qualified students to earn college credits by taking courses from the University of Hartford and other participating institutions while still in high school. The curriculum focuses on mathematics, science, technology, and engineering, with physics, engineering, and two math courses required during the first year. Its semester schedule is similar to that of the University, although students are enrolled in seven courses each semester. This stimulating academic program has produced a nationally competitive FIRST Robotics Team and is complemented by many individual-interest clubs and sports programs.

The high school’s $42 million building on the main University of Hartford campus features state-of-the-art equipment intended to enhance its learning environment and complement its social diversity experience. Graduating classes from University High School have produced a 95 percent or better rate of acceptance to colleges and universities. The high school was a recipient of one of the highly prestigious Magnet School of America Awards in 2012 and was listed as one of the top 100 high schools in America by U.S. News & World Report in 2011.

Parking

In order to park a motor vehicle in any University parking area, all students must register the vehicle with the Department of Public Safety and obtain a current parking permit. This is done through the University of Hartford self-service portal or the Public Safety website, http://publicsafety.hartford.edu. The permit must be purchased prior to or immediately upon bringing the vehicle to campus. Students will be billed for the parking permit. Permits are not transferable to another person or vehicle.

If, for any reason, students must operate a motor vehicle not displaying a University of Hartford parking permit, they must post the vehicle online through the University of Hartford’s self-service portal or the Public Safety website, or visit the Department of Public Safety office immediately upon arrival on campus to register the vehicle registration number, state, parking location, and other required information so that the vehicle will not be ticketed. Commuters who alternate the use of two vehicles may obtain a permit for the second vehicle at a reduced rate upon verification of ownership.

Prior to 4:30 p.m., commuter students may park in lots B, K Commuter, and A Annex (at the rear of A lot), in the unrestricted red spaces of D lot, and in areas of lots C and F. After 4:30 p.m., commuter parking is allowed in the above-noted areas and in nonreserved spaces in lots A, H, Gengras staff lot, and K faculty/staff lot. Commuters may also park in the front lot of the Sports Center when the facility is open and in front of the residence complexes, University Commons, and Regents Park from 7 a.m. to midnight.

Resident students are assigned to resident parking lots on a first-come, first-served basis. Students must follow the procedure for registration of resident vehicles. This information is posted on the parking page of the Department of Public Safety website.

All students registering vehicles for parking online are directed to “Your Car on Campus,” an electronic brochure of the rules and regulations governing operating and parking a vehicle on campus, as well as a list of resident parking lots.  It is recommended that a copy of the brochure be printed for reference when the parking agreement is signed electronically.

Please note that the University of Hartford is primarily a pedestrian community, and Connecticut state law dictates that pedestrians have the right of way.

University Libraries

University Libraries are the William H. Mortensen and Mildred P. Allen Memorial Libraries. Mortensen and Allen, located in the Harry Jack Gray Center, are convenient both to residential halls and to academic facilities.

Mortensen Library, the general library located in the middle of the Harry Jack Gray Center, houses collections in the arts, sciences, and humanities; the University archives; the education curriculum materials collection; and a special collection in Judaica. The Allen Library is located on the upper level of the east wing of the Gray Center, adjacent to The Hartt School, and houses music, dance, and related performing arts resources. Both libraries offer self-service photocopying and printing machines.

The Mortensen Library collection has holdings of more than 600,000 books, journals, music scores, microforms, videos, DVDs, and art plates. Approximately 36,400 scholarly journal subscriptions in electronic and paper form are maintained and supplemented by numerous databases. More than 100 PCs, iMacs, and laptops, as well as five collaborative computer pods (cPods), are available in Mortensen Library. Academically appropriate Internet subject resources may be accessed through the library network

Extensive University Libraries Web pages may be accessed at http://library.hartford.edu. The website includes a search box that helps users identify and locate all scholarly resources managed by University Libraries, including books, online or paper journal subscriptions, musical scores, audio and video recordings, and research databases. Additionally, University community members with University of Hartford e-mail accounts (available from Information Technology Services) may access restricted databases and electronic journals from outside the campus network.

The Mortensen Library serves the general University community, offering reference and instructional programs. Formal instruction is conducted in the Woods Family Classroom and the KF Room, located on the main level. Library hours of operation may be found at http://library.hartford.edu. Special hours are observed during the summer and holidays. There are videotape and DVD workstations in Mortensen Library for viewing the growing collection of more than 3,700 videotapes and DVDs. Group study areas are available. The Mortensen Library also offers the Dorothy Goodwin Café, a welcoming space for the entire community.

The Mildred P. Allen Memorial Library, located adjacent to The Hartt School on the upper level of the east wing of the Harry Jack Gray Center (above Wilde Auditorium), provides reference, circulating, and online materials in the fields of music, dance, music theatre, and related arts.  The Allen Library’s collections, services, and facilities are open to the entire University community.

Its total holdings of more than 86,600 items include approximately 22,200 books and bound journals on music and dance, 41,000 musical scores, 22,700 sound recordings (including recordings of Hartt operas, concerts, and recitals), and 1,100 DVDs and videocassettes. Thousands of additional audio tracks are streamed online. Subscriptions to more than 400 online and print journals allow students and faculty to remain abreast of current research.

In addition, the Allen Library website presents extensive resources in, and finding aids for, music, dance, theatre, and related performing arts (http://library.hartford.edu/allenlibrary).

The Allen Library’s facilities include 17 dual boot public iMacs with Windows 7 and Mac OSX; all provide access to Microsoft Office, online resources, and some music software.  Four new Macbooks and four new PC laptops are available for in-library use; Macbooks have music notation software, Finale, and Sibelius. CD players, turntables, cassette players, and DVD/VHS players, installed at eight carrels and in three listening rooms, are available for listening to and viewing items. Self-service photocopiers and printers are located at the front of the library. Two seminar rooms (one large, one small) with AV and computer projection are available for teaching, group study, and meetings. Reading and study areas have wireless Internet access.

The Allen Library is open Monday through Thursday from 8:30 a.m. until 11 p.m., Friday from 8:30 a.m. until 6 p.m., Saturday from 11 a.m. until 5 p.m., and Sunday from noon until 11 p.m. Special hours are observed during the summer and holidays.

Interlibrary resource-sharing services are supplemented by the libraries of the colleges and universities in the Hartford Consortium for Higher Education; all consortium libraries are open to University of Hartford students and faculty for research and reference. Faculty, staff, and students at 44 Connecticut institutions of higher education may also borrow resources from Council of Connecticut Academic Library Directors participating institutions. Ask at the Mortensen Library Circulation Desk for information. Students who obtain a borrowing card from a Connecticut public library may borrow from all public libraries in the state.

Residential Facilities

The University provides a variety of residential options to meet student housing needs. The traditional- style, first-year residence halls comprise 24 individual houses that make up six complexes, each complex housing approximately 260 undergraduate students. First-year students should expect an assignment in one of the complexes or in a Residential Learning Community (RLC) in Hawk Hall, our newest residence hall. (It is sometimes necessary to offer overflow assignments in the complexes to accommodate a large incoming class.)

Hawk Hall is the most recent addition to our residential facilities. The home of our Residential Learning Communities, Hawk Hall is organized around theme communities where students live among others who share their interests or who are taking courses together. Students who are selected for an RLC live together and collaborate closely with fellow students, faculty, and staff. In addition, they have a special opportunity to become leaders through required participation in service to the University or the community. The eight RLCs are Environmental Awareness, Destinations, Leadership, Wellness, The Adult Journey, Honors, WISET (Women in Science, Engineering, and Technology), and Hawk Spirit.

Regents Park. In this suite-style facility, each suite includes a living room and snack/dining area. This facility is traditionally chosen by students who are sophomores and above; however, approximately 20 percent of the residents are first-year students. There is wall-to wall carpeting in all rooms. Lounges for studying and social use as well as laundry facilities are available.

Village Apartments. Grouped in quads, each with its own courtyard, the apartments consist of one, two, or three bedrooms, accommodating two, four, or six students. Each apartment has a fully equipped kitchen, a living room, and one, two, or three bedrooms. Both duplex-style and one-floor apartments are available.

Bedrooms are furnished with beds, dressers, and desks. A dining table and chairs are provided, but it is expected that students will add their own choice of living room furniture, accessories, cooking utensils, china, etc. First-year students are not assigned to the Village Apartments.

Park River Apartments. This apartment facility is designed to house approximately 260 upperclass students. Like the Village Apartments, each Park River apartment consists of a fully equipped kitchen with a dishwasher, furnished bedrooms, and one bathroom. Additionally in Park River, the living room is furnished.

Both the Village and Park River are intended to serve as ideal transition units for upperclass students soon to embark on independent living. Although a high degree of personal responsibility is expected of these residents, they enjoy all the convenience and support of the University’s campus services, facilities, and activities.

Asylum Avenue Facilities

The 10.5-acre Asylum Avenue campus, former home of Hartford College for Women, is located at the intersection of Asylum Avenue and Elizabeth Street in Hartford’s historic west end. There are townhouse accommodations for 26 graduate students at this location. The graduate program in Architecture is also located on this campus.

The Asylum Avenue campus is home to the University’s Center for Professional Development, a legacy of Hartford College for Women, which offers career counseling for individuals, continuing and professional education, programs for corporations and organizations, and the Entrepreneurial Center. Also located on the Asylum Avenue campus is the Construction Institute, a nonprofit, nonpartisan, professional association that is affiliated with the University and provides educational, informational, and research services to the state’s building and construction community.

Handel Center Campus

The seven-acre Handel Center campus is located at 35 Westbourne Parkway in Hartford and is home to The Hartt School’s Dance and Theatre Divisions, as well as the University’s Office of Institutional Advancement and the Office of Alumni Relations. The Mort and Irma Handel Performing Arts Center opened in 2008. It is a 56,000-square-foot facility that was converted from a 1920s Albert Kahn–designed auto distributorship into a 21stcentury, state-of-the-art performance, rehearsal, and classroom space for dance and theatre students.

All dance classes for Dance Division students are held in the south wing of the Handel Performing Arts Center. Classes for Theatre Division majors are held in the north wing. The campus shuttle service runs between the Bloomfield Avenue campus and the Handel Center campus weekdays from 7 a.m. to 10:30 p.m.

Food Services

University Commons is centrally located to all residence halls. This all-you-care-to-eat facility offers a variety of cutting-edge American entrees, ethnically inspired foods, vegetarian selections, and a Kosher Kitchen that is under the supervision of Rabbi Yitzchok Adler from Beth David Synagogue. The Kosher Kitchen celebrates Jewish culture with a variety of dishes that are prepared on site daily.

Gengras Café* is a walk-through bistro located in the Gengras Student Union. Visit the Food Court for favorites like Burger Studio or Extreme Pita; Bene Pizza & Pasta offering thin-crust pizza varieties and a made-to-order pasta station; and Einstein Bros. Bagels.  Homemade soups, a build-your-own salad bar, and extensive grab-and-go selections are also available, including salads, sandwiches, and snacks.  These locations accept meal equivalencies.

1877 Club Restaurant, in the Harry Jack Gray Center, offers an upscale buffet menu in a restaurant-style setting. Dining Dollars cash, credit, and HawkCASH are accepted.

Village Market Provisions on Demand is centrally located in the heart of the campus. Village Market offers a vast array of products, from fresh-baked breads and bulk candy to a full line of dairy products, health and beauty aids, kosher and organic food sections, and more.

Market City Deli offers fresh-made hot sandwiches, grinders, and panini. Grab-and-go items as well as premade meals are available.  This location accepts late-night meal equivalencies.

Hawk’s Nest,* our late-night restaurant, is a popular place for students to socialize with their friends, watch large-screen TV, and enjoy live entertainment. It features pizza, burgers, chicken sandwiches, fresh salads, Island Oasis Smoothies, and a variety of snacks.  This location accepts dinner meal equivalencies.

Village Market Express, conveniently located in Dana Hall on the first floor, offers fresh coffees, juices, snacks, and sandwiches ready to go.

Dorothy Goodwin Café
This bustling venue in the Mortensen Library features Starbucks coffee, teas, and espressos. Wireless Internet service is now available.

Backstage Café**
Located in the Handel Performing Arts Center on the Albany Avenue campus, this café serves made-to-order sandwiches and Starbucks coffee in a pleasant, comfortable atmosphere.  This location accepts lunch meal equivalencies.

 *These locations accept meal equivalencies.
**Meal equivalency for lunch only.